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Job hopping in India?

Check this out:

http://news.com.com/2100-1022_3-5068795.html?tag=lh

"'The current average rate of attrition faced by the industry is between 30 percent to 35 percent,' Ashu Calapa, vice president of Icici OneSource, said recently at an industry meeting in Bangalore."

People jumping jobs means rising wages (they wouldn't be "attritioning" if there was no were else to go).  Which means offshoring becomes more expensive.  Etc. etc.

Another trickle of good news for job prospects, I think.

Jim Rankin
Wednesday, August 27, 2003

That's only for call center workers.  Where there's always turnover because it's a rough life.

There's still hope.  One point that the article made, and I agree with it is that the non-sweatshop foreign outsourced workers know that, while they are getting paid well by local standards, they are working cheaply.  Just about every family in India that can afford to be educated probably has a member that is one of the so-called first world countries like the US or the UK.

The question is if enough of them will organize well enough to adequately drive the prices up.

Flamebait Sr.
Wednesday, August 27, 2003

Sounds like 1999

John Rosenberg
Wednesday, August 27, 2003

wages are rising now the the growing middle calss is becoming accutomed to the lifestyle.

China scares the curry right out of them.

doobius
Wednesday, August 27, 2003

The job market for IT in India is pretty much like it was over here in 1997 to 2000.

Except the pay is around US$3000 per annum or so. It depends - the above is just an indication for a fresh grad C/C++

The market here in North America is pretty toast - we placed ads earlier this month and had over 700 resumes per position.

Our company is better known so maybe the above stat is not reflective on the actual supply and demand.

Ram Dass
Wednesday, August 27, 2003

> The market here in North America is pretty toast - we
> placed ads earlier this month and had over 700 resumes
> per position.

That is not surprising if each unemployed developer send
out 700 resumes.

Amour Tan
Wednesday, August 27, 2003

All the smart developers from India live in America.

True?

Why would you stay in India if you had the chance to move to America, earn more money and have a better standard of living?  After you stuff away a hundred grand or so you can retire in comfort to your hometown in India.

cs
Wednesday, August 27, 2003

"The market here in North America is pretty toast - we placed ads earlier this month and had over 700 resumes per position."

That's a pretty weak piece of economic analysis.

During the height of the boom I worked in a firm where we got hundreds, or THOUSANDS, of resumes for every position advertised. The reason has nothing to do with despertation, but because

a) There is extremely little cost to sending a resume out. Open that email, click resend, and maybe do a find/replace on some key words in a cover letter. It is no effort for a single individual to send out hundreds in a night.

b) There is a feasting mentality in "IT" : Even people entirely happy with a position often send out a dozen or so resumes monthly.

In an average mentropolitan area given that there are tens or hundreds of thousands of people who "Work with computers", and tens of thousands of new arrivals, getting 700 resumes for an advertised position is absolutely nothing.

Anonymous Cowboy
Wednesday, August 27, 2003

> All the smart developers from India
> live in America.

> Why would you stay in India if you had
> the chance to move to America, earn
> more money and have a better standard
> of living?  After you stuff away a hundred
> grand or so you can retire in comfort to
> your hometown in India.

I live in East Europe. I'm a talented developer, and had lots of chances to go to the US, UK or Germany. Yet I didn't.

Why?

Because I have close family and friends. My parents have done a lot for me when I was a child, I love them, and I want to be with them and support them now, while they are old.

That was the original motivation.

Now, after a few years of work, I have my own software development company.

Even if sometimes my earnings are small, I would NEVER go back to work for some stupid boss or manager, and give up control over my life.

So, for these two reasons I choose to stay in my country.

I know other good developers who also refuse to leave, for similar reasons.

A developer in Eastern Europe
Thursday, August 28, 2003

It's calll centre work. In the US and EU you do it if you have no skills, or to get you through college. In India they get top graduates to do it while they are waiting to get a proper job (which can take years after graduation in India).

Attritiion rates in call centres in the US and EU are extremely high, on a par with those in assembly line work, when those jobs existed. Add to the stress of micro-management (anybody ever read the MS Press books on running a call centre) abusive customers (who are stressed and really just want a bit of sympathy to start with, but take it out on you at first), and in India the grossly anti-social hours and feeling in a very status conscious society that you are being exploited, and the turnover rate is not surprising.

These figures do not have any bearing on computer programming jobs.

Stephen Jones
Thursday, August 28, 2003

Why? the developers in the US get paid what the developers in India get paid... maybe some extra hardship allowance, but I've heard numbers like $40 a day.

Unless you somehow manage to get a visa / green card / whatever to stay here and not be tied to a specific job. Then you can make a lot of money to send back home if you live simply. That is if you can find a job.

www.marktaw.com
Thursday, August 28, 2003

What I would like to see is statistics out of work american programmers v. statistics of working indian programmers to see if the correlation is as strong as everyone seems to think it is.

www.marktaw.com
Thursday, August 28, 2003

"... maybe some extra hardship allowance, but I've heard numbers like $40 a day."

Where do these people stay?  Most U.S. metropolitan areas, that doesn't even cover rent + transportation.

Jim Rankin
Thursday, August 28, 2003

Those are handled by the company. Company owned housing & company paid for transit cards.

This is NYC, and I know you know the area, so we're talking about work in Queens, live in Jersey, and the proper MetroCard.

I do wonder about their lunch though.. A $10 lunch is 25% of their paycheck.... Maybe they have free access to the employee cafeteria?

www.marktaw.com
Thursday, August 28, 2003

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