Fog Creek Software
Discussion Board




Buggy Oracle

I recently started to hack on Oracle 9i on Windows XP (Pro).

Is Oracle 9i very buggy or is it not ready for Windows?  Or is it the JRE on Windows that is effecting the whole set-up.

Or is it just me.

I have used IBM DB2 and SQL Server 2000 before - they may have their own issues but nothing like the hassle Oracle has been giving.

The reason I downloaded Oracle was to test and, hopefully, broaden my skills.

Ram Dass
Monday, August 18, 2003

In my experience -- they're all buggy (SQL Server, DB2, Oracle, (take your pick, mySQL, whatever)).

Oracle just stands out in your mind right now because it's the battle you're currently fighting.

For what it's worth, I thought MS SQueaL Swerver was the buggiest (I started in the 6.0/6.5 days, and it was *really* buggy). Because I've gotten used to it's quirks (and because MS has really improved it in it's current incarnation) it seems to me (subjective opinion) to be the least buggy  right now. It's probably not really, but it seems like it to me. If I were currently fighting with Oracle, I'd probably say it's buggy too <grin>!

Sgt. Sausage
Monday, August 18, 2003

Oracle indeed has their fair share of bugs and brain damages. In my experience, when you have worked out all the issues with it, it's rock solid.

I havent used 9i on the Windows platform heavily; I ran a development server on an old NT machine with no major problems. Now I run it on SuSE Linux and after the initial installation issues with tuning kernel parameters, it performs very decently.

Patrik
Monday, August 18, 2003

What are some examples of the "bugs" you are finding?

HeWhoMustBeConfused
Monday, August 18, 2003


Anybody know for sure... I heard that MS SQL Server has a builtin limit of 64K rows maximum for a select statement?

Joe AA
Monday, August 18, 2003

==>Anybody know for sure... I heard that MS SQL Server has a builtin limit of 64K rows maximum for a select statement?

I routinely do selects of multiple tens of millions of rows from very wide tables (don't ask, I didn't design it (and I'm sick to death that I had to sign my name on *that* code!)) that output files on the order of 4 to 5 GB (!). Been running in production once a week since 1999 without a hitch. This worked with both SQL 7.0 and SQL 2000. I doubt you'd be able to do it with earlier versions.

Where did you get such a bogus idea?

Sgt. Sausage.
Monday, August 18, 2003

If you're just starting to mess around with Oracle, some of the "bugs" you're encountering may be things you can fix by changing the configuration of the database and/or the client you're using to connect.

Beth Linker
Monday, August 18, 2003

JoeAA,

I think you are confusing sql server with the commonly used desktop database, excel, which does have a hard limit of 65k rows.

Mike
Monday, August 18, 2003

==> I think you are confusing sql server with the commonly used desktop database, excel, ...

Excel? A "database" ? Only for sufficiently small values of "a database" <grin>.

Actually, I read somewhere a few months ago that a very large amount of today's corporate data is still stored in simple spreadsheets. It would simply scare the heebeejeebees out of me if I had to use Excel as my primary "database". What are these people thinking?

Sgt. Sausage
Monday, August 18, 2003

Well, they aren't thinking.

They are dumb, and this is the natural state for them. And they just have Excel in front of them, so they just use that.

X.
Monday, August 18, 2003

"Where did you get such a bogus idea?"

Well... a friend of mine supports a datawarehouse application.  Originally MS SQL Server was selected for use as the database, and they ran into some sort of 64k row limit selection.  That caused a changeover to Oracle.

The project started in 2001, so I doubt if that was an extremely old version. 

Joe AA
Monday, August 18, 2003

To be honest, it sounds to me like FUD either from an Oracle vendor or a project manager who wanted to use Oracle.

This is a query run against SQL Server - note the returnset count in the lower right corner:
http://www.saintchad.org/sqlquery.gif

Philo

Philo
Monday, August 18, 2003

I think you're confusing "64k row limit" with "builtin limit of 64K rows". The first is true, but the second is non-sense.

The MS SQL storage structure goes something like: database -> extents -> pages -> rows. Each extent holds 8 pages, and each page has a 64k size limit. A row must fit within a single page, therefore the 64k limit.  By this, I mean that the field sizes must have summed total of <= 64k. Blobs get around this since they're stored as an 8 byte pointer.

So, the 64k row size limit has nothing to do with the number of rows that can be returned from a select statement. It's a data storage limitation.

Hope this helps.

Nick
Monday, August 18, 2003

Actually ... row size in SQL Server is limited to 8060 bytes... the only limits for SELECT statements are max. 4096 fields and max 256 tables (which I cannot imagine could become a problem for anyone).

Alexandru
Monday, August 18, 2003

You're right about the 8060 bytes. I thought the 8k limitation was for SQL 7.0 and that with SQL2K it was expanded to 64k.  But, I looked it up and it's still 8060 bytes.

Anyway, the capacity specs for SQL Server can be found here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/architec/8_ar_ts_8dbn.asp

Nick
Monday, August 18, 2003

I don't know about Oracle being buggy, but trying to use their tools to manage it on windows sucks, big time.

Try getting TOAD or some other tool and see if that helps.

pdq
Monday, August 18, 2003

Is it the database or the tools you are concerned about?

I have only had a few problems with bugs in the database (there is one right now that is driving me bonkers), but if you can get a testcase working (ie breaking), their support is very good.

OTOH, the desktop tools for Oracle suck big time. They look and feel horrible. I don't know of any professional DBAs that use any of the tools, other than SQL*Plus (which takes a bit of getting used to, but is generally OK).

The number 1 configuration tool for Oracle on Windows is Notepad :(

LesC
Monday, August 18, 2003

I gotta back up what pdq said here.

TOAD is a mandatory tool if you're doing anything semi-serious with Oracle.

Andrew Lighten
Monday, August 18, 2003

*  Recent Topics

*  Fog Creek Home