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I *hate* "server pricing"

I am so f'ing tired of companies putting out products that won't run on Win2k Server - instead you have to buy the "Server" or "Enterprise" edition that costs 5-10x as much. The biggest violator that comes to mind is Diskkeeper defrag and Panda antivirus software.

I run Win2k server on my desktop because I develop for Win2k server - I don't want anything more out of a defrag or antivirus program than any home user, but I get penalized.

Morons.

Philo

Philo
Thursday, August 14, 2003

I hate software pricing of any kind, unless i'm the one selling the software. :)

.
Thursday, August 14, 2003

Philo, for once I agree with you. I've been bitten by that same pricing structure many times. I want the product price to be reflective of the feature set, not an artificial limitation of which OS it runs on. Diskeeper also ticked me off that way, as did DriveImage and Partition Magic (although I think they've since removed those OS-based limitations).

Troy King
Thursday, August 14, 2003

Yes, a lot of companies think only large enterprises with deep pockets are going to have a server os.

Pretty dumb, but that is the way it is.

Mike
Friday, August 15, 2003

Defrag is easy -- you can dual-boot the thing -- but that's merely a workaround.  You know, developers are supposed to be the uber-market (remember the Ballmer dance?); perhaps it's worth a brief letter explaining that their pricing structure is designed to piss us off.

Sam Livingston-Gray
Friday, August 15, 2003

beating a dead horse, server pricing does seem annoying until you start selling your own software.

it is far easier for me to sell 20 copies of an $8000 enterprise edition than it is to sell 2000 copies of an $80 single user edition.  single developers are actually one of THE WORST markets to target as they are usually cheap bastards and these days are also usually broke.

thus i don't know what advice i can offer you. i have 6 computers in my own office all barricaded by a firewall. i don't run antivirus on my win2k server.

.
Friday, August 15, 2003

You can always try to convince them on producing a developer licence that is only licenced for MSDN Server licences.

Just me (Sir to you)
Friday, August 15, 2003

"it is far easier for me to sell 20 copies of an $8000 enterprise edition than it is to sell 2000 copies of an $80 single user edition.  single developers are actually one of THE WORST markets to target as they are usually cheap bastards and these days are also usually broke."

*And* they're the ones who recommend software to management (assuming mgmt hasn't been hypnotized by a salesperson or glossy brochure yet)

I always figured the dynamic to target would be:
- target developers with relatively inexpensive personal versions. Make the software painless to manage, but configurable.
- have an "enterprise version" (features like remote management, control of multiple computers, user licensing, etc) that's priced much, much higher
- bank on the developers loving it so much that they recommend the company buy it, despite the price tag.

This is how Microsoft generally operates. But what do they know? [grin]

Philo

Philo
Friday, August 15, 2003

I never have this problem. But I run BSD and Linux.

Tom Vu
Friday, August 15, 2003

Well then... I suppose you have bigger problems to deal with.

timmy
Saturday, August 16, 2003

> Well then... I suppose you have bigger problems to deal with.

What an insightful comment.... NOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It's especially ironic given that Slashdot just had a story about ... you guessed it ... server pricing, so there was actually a chance to do some interesting comparison, instead of mindless Linux/OSS bashing.

Guys, I've been a Linux user since the early days, but I've grasped something that all you Windows-loving proto-capitalist wannabes seem to have missed:

Customers want to get a job done, and they care about costs (including long-term costs like vendor lock-in). They don't care about the technical details, like, uh, what OS it is, except insofar as that influences the things they *do* care about, they leave that to the techies to squabble over.

Joel, for all his digs at Linux, clearly understands this. What don't *you*?

Peter Breton
Saturday, August 16, 2003

Peter,

This is all I gotta say: http://ask.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=03/08/15/233245&mode=thread&tid=106&tid=110&tid=185&tid=187

GiorgioG
Saturday, August 16, 2003

Giorgio,

This is the article that I referred to in my post.

It's a good read, and makes lots of interesting points. So far I have gotten much more out of it than this thread.....

Unlike Philo's problem (or one of Philo's problems ;) you can actually *install and run* whatever software you want on the OS, and in fact you can run the Enterprise editions at home if you want (ie, you don't have to have Developer at home and Enterprise at work because of pricing). Enterprise support, however, *is* expensive. Some of the people in the thread self-support, others buy it, and there are different strategies and pricing models that they use.

In short, there's a lot of info in that thread, and, unlike this board, a lot of the garbage is moderated down.

Peter Breton
Sunday, August 17, 2003

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