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VB6 license

I've been using a learning addition of VB6 so the license does NOT allow me to sell any applications I write with it.  However, I've written something that people would like to buy off of me, and I think I may have a market for my app. 
I'd just like to distribute my VB6 app and hope that everything is legal. 
Do you know where (how) can I buy VB6 license?
I've read on the MS website that there is an option to  buy VB.NET and then downgrade to VB6... Is it the only way?
And does it mean that I would lose VB.NET license?

junior_b
Monday, August 11, 2003

There's pelnty of copies of VB 6 available through the retail channel - look at any of the price comparison sites.

I'd also check ebay - you might get a good deal (just make sure you're getting a legal/non-academic version).

RocketJeff
Monday, August 11, 2003

Could you find someone with a legit license and compile with their version?

got loophole?
Monday, August 11, 2003

I am wondering if you can conservatively gamble. Basically you can do this:

1. Distribute a few copy for money.
2. When you have enough money, buy a copy as soon as you can.

Or this:

1. Look for someone who is willing to go through the trouble of selling it to you for $20-100 bucks by transfering the license to you legally using Micorosoft's license registration/tracking/transfer website.

As a side note, the boss of Virgin Megastore and virgin airway avoided tens of thousands of dollars of tariffs in his attempt to build a tiny music empire during his younger years, he was caught, and he paid up with the help of his parents. Mom said don't do it again. He probably never try again. The guy's not in jail today, but running a huge empire. There are certainties: 1) Don't mess with the law. 2) You'll be caught. 3) It does bend within reason.

The law is basically reasonable and designed to help you. If you care to bend it, just do it and remember to unbend it.

Anonymous
Monday, August 11, 2003

I strongly second the ebay approach. Worked very well for me some years back -- I got visual studio enterprise edition 6.0 for several hundred USD less than the normal retail price back in '99.

The other advice about non-academic, full-retail version is also very important  -- I contacted the vendors offering the product, as well as read what they'd posted to be sure I was getting a standard retail licensable version.

ebay is very much a 'caveat emptor' environment, but if you're careful, it's a wonderful resource.

cheers,

anonQAguy
Monday, August 11, 2003

Practical question: what is the *probability* that MS would audit a small time shrinkwrap product and determine that it's been developed and marketed without a valid licensed version of the language used to generate it? And that a license for the language is is not actually owned by the entity that is selling the app software in question?

Bear in mind, too, that many times products are released by a vendor that goes under a trade name that is quite different than that of the entity that purchased the software.  I simply don't see how the cross checking necessary to insure compliance is practical. And I've never heard of audits of VBRUNxx.DLL in real life.

I am not a lawyer (IANAL) but - it *may* make the most pragmatic sense for one to try selling the product without doing anything along the lines of buying a full professional version. Then upon the first  paying order, buy the language before you ship and be done with the issue. No sales, no violation. Otherwise, instant compliance. (although this disregards one important point - which is that if the language is *that* large an expense, then the developer probably doesn't have the money to market the product anyway.)

Also, the CDs for some of these educational editions of MS development products - and I mean the version 6s of VB, VC++, etc - appear to be physically identical with the professional level versions. My guess is that the generated binary is no different.  So MS would *have* to check their registration database and conduct an on site audit in order to enforce this properly.

Bored Bystander
Tuesday, August 12, 2003

Is it typical for the readers, and some of them regular contributors, of a software business-focused discussion board to advise someone on the many ways that he could work around paying for proper licenses for the software he wants to use? And profit from?

I find this line of reasoning to be quite surprising and dissapointing.

  --Josh

JWA
Tuesday, August 12, 2003

With VB.NET Standard edition going for $93.99 or less http://www.programmersparadise.com/Product.pasp?txtCatalog=Paradise&txtCategory=&txtProductID=M47+M27G , I fail to see the financial problem here? The VB.NET licence will allow you to downgrade to VB6 AFAIK.

Just me (Sir to you)
Tuesday, August 12, 2003

I thought the .Net Standard Editions didn't permit you to resell developed applications? So I assume that this license is transitive to the downgrade application?

Bored Bystander
Tuesday, August 12, 2003

This is the second time this "I thought the .Net Standard Editions didn't permit you to resell developed applications?" has come up in the last few days on this board.
I have never seen any restrictions that would support this assumption. Even the free framework SDK has no restrictions in this way.
Can you quote any part of the EULA that would imply any such restrictions?

Just me (Sir to you)
Tuesday, August 12, 2003

Are you sure you are not confusing with the free personal version of Borlands C# Builder, which does have a "non-commercial use only" restriction?

Just me (Sir to you)
Tuesday, August 12, 2003

I don't think so - the 'standard edition' for Microsoft developer products have always had the "you can't distribute the programs you develop" clause.

I can't find the license wording on Microsoft's site, but there is a page that compares the Standard v/s the Professional versions. This is the one for VB: http://msdn.microsoft.com/vbasic/howtobuy/choosing.aspx

RocketJeff
Tuesday, August 12, 2003

It's not the Standard versions that have that limitation, it's only the Education versions. They are sold cheap to students so they can learn. If they want to make some money from the program they'll need to buy a real license, which begins with the Standard version.

  --Josh

JWA
Tuesday, August 12, 2003

Visual C++ .NET Standard edition does not allow you to create optimized executables. If this is not a problem for your application - you can distribute as many executables as you want.

GD

Gene
Tuesday, August 12, 2003

While the "pro" versions may have more features suited to the "professional" developer, the basic versions are more than capable in their own right and carry no limitation as to their use in commercial development.

Just me (Sir to you)
Wednesday, August 13, 2003

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