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AAAARRRGGG!!! I hate Programmers!!


I like my ATI video card but I want to strangle the guy who wrote the video capture software for it. 

Every time I run the program, it automatically inserts an entry into the registry so that it runs every time I start my computer.

How rude.

Common Sense Guy
Monday, August 04, 2003

Hate the managers, sales or marketing people instead.

The reality is, some poor schmuck programmer was probably told at gunpoint, based upon "product positioning" ka-ka, to create the startup registry entry.

It's most likely political. The vendor probably wants their stuff in the customer's face constantly. If you run the program once, the thinking goes you must "need" it at all times.

Bored Bystander
Monday, August 04, 2003

Is it adding an entry to your Registry's RunOnce key? Maybe you can rename the program's .EXE file, so the RunOnce command at startup cannot find it. Problem solved! :-) I did this for some of Real Networks' "helpful" software.

runtime
Monday, August 04, 2003

Bang out a hex editor and change the key; just one character should stop that.

Mickey Petersen
Monday, August 04, 2003

Dont be so quick to think its marketing/positioning ka-ka.
Maybe the programmer made it that way because it was helpful to him/her to have it that way while he developed it. Then it got released that way.

James Ladd
Monday, August 04, 2003

Your comment about the "poor schmuck programmer" reminded me of the following Pigdog "Software Jihad" editorial. Warning: not for those easily offended by four-letter words.  <:-)

http://www.pigdog.org/auto/software_jihad/link/2581.html

"MY GOD MAN!!! Do you realize what you're doing? DO you? What kind of HONEY BITCH TOOL have you become? Have you no shame? None at all?

Look at you. Look at yourself. Look at what you've BECOME. Your job is writing code to BREAK PEOPLE'S COMPUTERS if they dare to put a CELINE DION CD into their disk drive. Is this what you always wanted? Is this what you went to school for? Is this what we've all -- all of us, every other hacker and programmer and geek and computer person -- is this what we've all helped you to do?

runtime
Monday, August 04, 2003

I think it's that the people who write device drivers cannot be counted upon to write quality drivers most of the time.

Flamebait Sr.
Monday, August 04, 2003

"I think it's that the people who write device drivers cannot be counted upon to write quality drivers most of the time."

As someone who once was in the video card and device driver industry, this is more true than you may suspect.  The general process for developing a display driver is:

1. Make it boot.

2. Make it run fast.

3. Ship it.

4. Fix the blatant bugs.

The hardware is developed in a similar fashion.  This is because the attention and praise for being fastest is worth more money than anything else.  (Nevermind that the difference between 138fps and 142fps in UT makes not a whit of difference in gameplay.)

I do expect that when video cards outpace the demands games put on them things will start to change.  That's a few years down the road, however, as the kind of realism games developers want aren't currently possible to obtain in realtime.

Thomas
Monday, August 04, 2003

Just open Regedit if you have Windows XP or RegEdt32 if you have Windows NT/2000, find the HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run key and right-click and pick Permissions. 

Set the permissions to Read-Only for everyone.

Do the same in HKCU\... and no program will ever be that rude again.

Wayne
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

You should email the company and let them know that you dislike that. Do it in a polite tone, and they will even read it. Most, if not all, companies keep track and statistics about what sort of messages they get from their customers, so if you whine... err... express your opinions often enough, things may happen. Don't count on them reading Joel on Software ;-)

The fact is, that whoever made the decision may well not even realize that someone doesn't like that cool automatic feature.

Antti Kurenniemi
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Wayne, that rocks!

Mr Jack
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

[The reality is, some poor schmuck programmer was probably told at gunpoint, based upon "product positioning" ka-ka, to create the startup registry entry. ]

Yah, cuz, we NEVER make mistakes, right?

Get real.

anon
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Wayne

what hinders the application programmer to use
RegSetKeySecurity to undo the read only flag?

Ignore my ignorance
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

You mean you guys are running as admin? For shame! :-p

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

You don't need to be an admin to write to HKCU

--
ee

eclectic_echidna
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

No, but you could take away write permissions for the current user. It would require admin privs to restore such permissions. If you run as non-admin, it couldn't be circumvented.

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

The answer to your problem:

http://www.mlin.net/StartupMonitor.shtml

Nick Pavona
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

RealPlayer (piece of s--t) does the same thing-writes itself to run everytime at bootup if I need to view a .ram file. I hate .ram files for that reason and wish Web sites would stop using them. I use jv16 power tool to clean my registry/check the run key weekly.

http://www.vtoy.fi/jv16/shtml/jv16powertools.shtml

Mike Sivertsen
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

With Real and Quicktime, as of the last versions I installed, you can just delete the EXEs that they put in the Run key.  They are separate EXEs that the main app isn't dependent on.  Of course, it's only a matter of time between Real and Apple get "smart" enough to circumvent this.  It's really fun to use software that deliberately antagonizes its users. 

SomeBody
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

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