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American company -transfer?

I have been working with a Russian company, on some leading edge algorithms, software, which basically mirrors the functionality of another american company which is growing fast in this same area.

However I really do feel that I am a good fit for this companies position.This expertise has been developed while working for this russian company.(all of these ideas generated by myself).
My wife is in the US doing her PHD, and I wish to join her.


Should I use this as a selling point to one of the founders of this U.S based startup?
If I give the name of my present company, should it be wise?

Sergei
Saturday, July 19, 2003

Does your wife plan to stay in the US after she completes her PhD?

The American company will be looking for a long-term investment, so if she plans to return to Russia upon graduation, you have to think how to approach them. If, on the other hand, she'd like to stay if possible, then I think you're an excellent choice for the American company.

As for mentioning your current employer - the only real downside would be risking your current job should word get back to them that you're looking to emigrate.

Philo

Philo
Saturday, July 19, 2003

"The American company will be looking for a long-term investment"

Where is this mythical company that thinks long term?

Even if they hired you for a few years, that just means less time you could spend on their competitor's business.


Saturday, July 19, 2003

i think you should wait and see where you wife gets a job after completing her PhD, then make your move...

best..

Prakash S
Saturday, July 19, 2003

Yes, you should mention both your current company and the fact that your wife already lives in the USA.

good luck!

...
Saturday, July 19, 2003

Sergei, go for it. The company will have to sponsor you for a H1B visa which many companies are reluctant to do these days though. Use your best selling points, and if you have niche skills these might prove important if you target the right companies.

I never noticed the long-term HR investment Philo speaks about. The PhD probably will take around 5 years anyway.

I am not completely sure but if you just want to join your wife there might be some other non-working visas available.

Good luck!

coresi
Saturday, July 19, 2003

As someone who assessed resumes up here in Canada for a mid-sized firm, the one thing that amazed me is that we got literally tens of thousands of resumes from immigrants from Russian, the Middle East, etc. Every one of them yielded credentials in their home country out the yahoo, and claimed to have worked on Earth shattering applications and technologies. On paper they were amazing candidates who should have no problem. Yet approximately 90% of the time that we interviewed them, it was clear that they were totally and absolutely clueless. I'm not talking just about cluelessness in the technologies that they indicated, but that they just didn't seem to be up to par to the credentials that they claimed (I mean you expect a phd holder to be somewhat intelligent). Of the remaining 10% (who showed some competency, yet many of them we hired purely because of the credentials) and we hired some of them, and the result was in most cases a disaster: Again just absolute cluelessness, coupled with a attitude of personal helplessness: I don't know if it's a factor of the style of government that people live under, but these were the people who would hit a road block and throw up their hands and claim it's impossible, etc. Very odd.

Anyways, I see three possibilities:

-A lot of immigrants horribly inflate their resumes because they figure that few people will be calling Somewhere University in Somewheristan, or that company where they did "cutting edge, super duper development". It seemed that everyone from the middle east had amassed every educational credential.

-The standards are just much, much lower to accomplish these credentials.

Am I anti-immigrant? Not at all. We hired a couple that were brilliant and become core elements of the company. My point is moreso that either the standards are so low, or the inflation is so high, that it is very difficult hiring from the immigrant pool because of all of the noise.

That is all.

Xenophobe
Saturday, July 19, 2003

If going to the US is what you want, it is certainly worth a shot to try to get a job in the US.

I am also originally from that part of the world. If your wife has J-1 visa you could probably get J-2 for now and no H1B is needed. If she has F-1, you do need H1B.

Regardless of whether your wife and you would like to stay in the US or not, there is no reason to tell this to the US company. Tell them exactly what they want to hear. Circumstances frequently change anyway, so technically there is nothing wrong with that ...

Structure your communication with the US company in terms of how they could benefit from employing you (unique perspective, stellar skills, etc). But in these times
you'll have to be really good to be imported to the US since the unemployment is high. Regardless, discuss visa arrangements down the line such as sponsorship for a green card (GC). Even if you do not plan to stay in the US forever, it is still convenient to have GC just to work here.

Overall, go for it. If there is no job offer, you'd still learn a few interesting things.

Mr Curiousity
Saturday, July 19, 2003

"Yet approximately 90% of the time that we interviewed them, it was clear that they were totally and absolutely clueless. I'm not talking just about cluelessness in the technologies that they indicated, but that they just didn't seem to be up to par to the credentials that they claimed"

Pardon my ignorance, but is not there a large pool of clueless candidates regardless of where they came from?
Your only problem was that when you parsed their resumes you used North American standards of cluelessness whereas you should have used Russian standards for that. These take time to develop, you should have seeked an advice from somebody russian born ...

Mr Curiousity
Saturday, July 19, 2003

Xenophobe: so how come that a large percentage of Canadian IT employees are landed immigrants from some sort of XSTAN? I don’t know the exact statistics and I doubt that the Canadian government provides one, but most of my IT colleagues in Canada were first or second generation immigrants. Is that because you have no clues?

So please spare us the xenophobia…

coresi
Saturday, July 19, 2003

" so how come that a large percentage of Canadian IT employees are landed immigrants from some sort of XSTAN"

Because they're GENIUSES in those countries! I only wish we had their amazing super intelligence!

Actually, mortard, it's because Canada has a very low birthrate, like most Western countries (unlike the baby factories in the Middle East/Asia), so we have very few "natives" entering new fields like IT. I'll take it as well that you live in the GTA area where several hundred thousand immigrants yearly settle, so it's hardly surprizing that they have a large impact in IT.

However you amazingly totally missed my point: There is clearly, without any doubt, massive bullshit that goes on in immigrants credentials and resumes (to the point that Western resume exaggerations truly are nothing more than white lies).

Xenophobe
Saturday, July 19, 2003

I suspect that xenophobe is right on this one, though why he chose to bring it up here I don't know.

We hired a sysadmin because he gave the right replies at the interview. He just said he didn't really know to almost every question. We were so overjoyed at his honesty we took him on. In fact he was lying; half of the things he claimed to know nothing of he knew a fair bit about, but he's been advised about what we expected.

On the other hand the number of people who have jobs despite mind boggling incompentence is unbelievable. It's almost as if they grab five people and hope one of them will work.

Stephen Jones
Sunday, July 20, 2003

Stephen,
can you give a few examples of the incompetence you have seen in the workplace? just curious

Sergei
Sunday, July 20, 2003

An assistant sysadmin that sets up people's email but  doesn't test the profiles, so in fact it doesn't work.

A guy who said we ought to install wifi so we could SMS the students mobile phones (in a country with no WAP or GPRS).

A guy who spent six months transfering an Access database of student accommodation to an Oracle one that does exactly the same thing.

Two consultants and two staff that spent nine months of the main database project and failed to implement one single change requested and needed.

A CIO who sents the web site out for approval on 200 sheets of paper, and refuses to let us see it on a computer.

A sysadmin (the good one) who sends an email telling everybody to delete sflnbk.exe and then the manager formally complains about me when I email everybody to tell them it's a hoax.

And the guy from Microsoft who gave the sysadmins a course on Exchange 5.5 and told them the reason we couldn't send attachments out of the domain was because we needed to upgrade to Exchange 2000. I used to be sending all attachments separately from my private dial up account, until some months later the sysadmin had a look a tab in settings called Advanced!

Stephen Jones
Sunday, July 20, 2003

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