Fog Creek Software
Discussion Board




Startup.com

Anyone seen this? I think it's amazing that the producer & directors picked such a perfect example to follow. What I find really notable is the managment - to me they're almost characatures - Kaleil is the slippery salesman, all talk and flair; Tom is the techy geek with almost no business sense.

I also really like this quote from Roger Ebert:
"Eventually govWorks.com has 200 employees working on the site, and still Tuzman despairs that it's not good enough to be released to the public. How does a guy like James Berardinelli open one of the best movie review sites on the Web all by himself, and 200 people can't figure out how to collect parking tickets? Berardinelli even writes his own reviews."

Philo

Philo
Monday, June 30, 2003

I saw it and found it rather interesting - in my opinion it was quite well done in so far as you could understand both the leads in their own ways but at the time they had difficulty understanding each other.

I was also interested to see what became of them and found this:

http://www.publicdatasystems.com/pds/index.htm

Konrad
Monday, June 30, 2003

As Tom Herman points out in the Washington Post interview he links to, "The movie was really about two people and their personal relationship," not how to run (or how not to run) a dot-com.

I liked that, because I found it to be much more interesting than the ins and outs of govWorks' existence.  They *were* the ins and outs of govWorks' existence.

I was most struck by Kaleil's attitude that you have to separate business from personal.  The film amply showed that this is impossible.  Business *is* personal.  Especially a dot-com.

Brent P. Newhall
Monday, June 30, 2003

I thought it was telling that the opening scene featured the founder trying to arrange for venture funding before he had even quit his day job or developed a product.

Jason
Monday, June 30, 2003

I know little about VC money, but isn't the purpose of the money to fund research and development, at least partly?

Spam
Monday, June 30, 2003

That quote from Ebert was very interesting.

In other news, Ebert has also been found to be an international expert on submarine warfare after his review of "Red Storm Rising", and will be receiving the starting Halfback for the Philadelphia Eagles due to his insightful comments about "Any Given Sunday".

;-)

Spam
Monday, June 30, 2003

Except that, having built a few systems single-handedly in less than twelve months, I happen to agree with him. :-)

Hmmm... new quote? "Give me five talented people and I'll move mountains. Give me fifty talented people and we'll discuss plans for moving the mountain"

Philo

Philo
Monday, June 30, 2003

Give me 200 and we can make a MOVIE about making plans to build mountains.

Marc
Tuesday, July 01, 2003

I tried to watch startup.com a couple times and couldn't get into it. 'e-dreams', the story of Kozmo, was much more entertaining to me. Shows up on IFC and other channels like that every so often.
http://www.edreamsmovie.com/

brian
Tuesday, July 01, 2003

Feh, I didn't like it.

Very amateurish (yes, even for a documentary), and it ended very abruptly. You could almost see the filmmaker run out of cash (like his subjects), and that was very jarring. I was at least as interested in seeing them during their downfall as I was in observing their rise, but 3/4 of the film focuses on the company on its way up.

IMNSHO, the only reason why Startup.Com gets the attention it does, is because of the paucity of films made about such a rich and dramatic topic.

Joe Grossberg
http://www.joegrossberg.com

Joe Grossberg
Tuesday, July 01, 2003

*  Recent Topics

*  Fog Creek Home