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Perhaps a redundant Job question.

I've seen similar questions asked before, but I've never really seen it asked how I'm about to ask it.  I apologize if I've missed a FAQ or something, but I am curious about this.

What does it take to be considered a "X programmer" -- "X" being your choice of language, not X windows.  What level of programs would I need in my portfolio for an employer to consider me a "X programmer" if I were being interviewed?  Are there kinds of programs coders or managers out there use as a standard "baseline" for this kind of thing?

Any thoughts, opinions, business philosophies would be welcome.  Also, I realize that the market and required skill sets vary in this industry from month-to-month, so I'm not looking for an absolute answer.  A vague idea or what experience has taught anyone is welcomed and appreciated.  Thanks.

Andrew Burton
Wednesday, June 25, 2003

Hold on, let me edit my resume.

There. Now I'm a Perl programmer. [grin]

Seriously, one thing about IT that some love, some hate - you are what you say you are until proven otherwise.

Philo

Philo
Wednesday, June 25, 2003

So it's...

"You're resume says you have experience using a Cray Supercomputer.  Really?"

"Do you have a Cray I could demonstrate on?"

"Well, no..."

"Then, yes, I can."

Andrew Burton
Wednesday, June 25, 2003

You may claim X on your resume if you are prepared to be asked questions about it while being interviewed.  That's the general rule.

This doesn't really answer your question because really, it's a game.  Don't put enough and you won't make it through the automated filters.  Put too many and you look like an idiot and don't get the job.

Do at least one or two things with X before you claim it on your resume, so that you can at least talk intelligently about it. 

Flamebait Sr.
Wednesday, June 25, 2003

Well, there was a thread earlier on "fresh" vs "experienced" programmer.

The punchline is that some on this board will only consider that you know X if you spend 2 years using it.

So, if you think you're from this camp, use the 2 year rule for the resume. Don't pass the chance to stand up for your beliefs :-)

Others, on the other hand, do not care about particular X as long as you are good at picking up new stuff.

And if you belong to this group, put as much as you can so at least you'll have a chance to get past that 1st group and have a shot at talking to those that have got a clue (the 2nd group).

Mr Curiousity
Wednesday, June 25, 2003

Is it that simple ? really ? I missed the thread about the 2 year rule, but I can point to several cases where someone has worked on a particular technology for far less than 2 years, but can be considered competent in it.

Perl, for instance.. use it for private projects, havent used it much in work (quite simply because its not that kind of work, most of the time.. requires a specific language). I know my way around CPAN, have coded object oriented Perl and so on.. What I havent had is projects where someone else codes Perl as well.. so, what do I say ? I'm a Perl programmer ? or not ? if you dont have the experience in real work situations to back up your claim, is it even worth your credibility to say that you know something ?

deja vu
Wednesday, June 25, 2003

"Is it that simple ? really ? I missed the thread about the 2 year rule, but I can point to several cases where someone has worked on a particular technology for far less than 2 years, but can be considered competent in it."

Well, read this:

http://discuss.fogcreek.com/joelonsoftware/default.asp?cmd=show&ixPost=52641&ixReplies=41

Some apparently believe that if don't do your time with a certain language, you surely CAN'T BE COMPETENT in it ...

Mr Curiousity
Wednesday, June 25, 2003

Did you really have to use the word "redundant"?  :(

Kyralessa
Thursday, June 26, 2003

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