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What to do when you reach version 9?

We are working hard on finishing and releasing version 9 of our software application.

How should we name the app after version 9? Is version 10 ok, in the minds of most people? How about version 14, or 15?

What is a good naming scheme for a large version number?

WASP
Sunday, June 22, 2003

You could drop the version naming scheme and call your product something like MyProduct 2003.

Dave B.
Sunday, June 22, 2003

Go with years and then strange 2 letter combinations maybe? It has worked for other companies (and it works for cars, you don't see the Holden Commodore Ver. 15.2a)

Or you could do what we have and change it to "Professional" and others. We had "<PRODUCT> 5,6,7" and then we switched to "<PRODUCT> Professional, Enterprise etc." and now we don't even have a "marketing" version number anymore (which is what the 5,6,7 numbers were, because all of those products were really version 1.0 products - i.e. a rewrite after each version)

Chris
Sunday, June 22, 2003

As a user, I like sequential version numbers. I prefer "15.2" to "2003". With the sequential numbers, I can tell at a glance if I have the latest revision. I have noticed on many "year version" applications I have, I cannot tell if I have kept current because I have to go count patches on the download page.

Troy King
Sunday, June 22, 2003

We have the same problem here, only we already call our product "2003 Enterprise 8.5". :)

I wonder what the fsck our manager will do when we reach version 10!

John
Sunday, June 22, 2003

>strange 2 letter combinations

Do the Pentium thing and come up with a fun way of saying 10 in another language, preferably latin because it sound more official, and then name version 11 "Decca 2" or something.

www.MarkTAW.com
Sunday, June 22, 2003

In the same vein as OSX, X11R6, and Emacs 21.3 ... I suggest you just keep using numbers until you run out of them, in which case you start using letters ...

Alyosha`
Sunday, June 22, 2003

What's wrong with a version numbered 10 (or higher)? There is no need for version numbers to be a single digit. Doesn't Adobe have "Illustrator 10"? Besides, it "takes ten years to get software right", so if you have one release a year, version 10 should be a really good release!!!

Philip Dickerson
Sunday, June 22, 2003

"Do the Pentium thing and come up with a fun way of saying 10 in another language, preferably latin because it sound more official, and then name version 11 "Decca 2" or something."

Paraphrasing a Desilu exec:
"'deka' means ten of something. 'Deci' means one-tenth of something. 'Decca' is a record label"

Philo <- grumbling about books never being around when you need them...

Philo
Sunday, June 22, 2003

Progress Software is about to beta Progress v10.

I thought it would look funny, but it doesn't. I think it is like the whole 2000 thing. Remember all of the "what will we call the decade" questions in 1999?

Marc
Sunday, June 22, 2003

Has anyone come up with an answer to that yet?

My favorite is "the naughties" but that won't fly in the US...

Philo

Philo
Monday, June 23, 2003

Looking back in history you don't have a recognisable decade until the roaring twenties.

Before that always gets called 'turn on the centurary.'  I guess we'll just call it 'turn of the millenium.'

Ged Byrne
Monday, June 23, 2003

Philo - I'm very aware of Decca being a record label.

Being a philistine American and thoroughly NOT on the metric system I have no idea what the proper latin term for 10 is.

www.MarkTAW.com
Monday, June 23, 2003

Several things you can do:

Have a 4 digit release number 9.0.1.2, that will last you
a while. Dont forget to slap on an italic i ater it :-)

I personally dont have problems with high version numbers, it tells me its a mature product. If it isnt I will start to wonder about your release cycles :-)

Patrik
Monday, June 23, 2003

Philo,  shouldn't that be "the noughties" ??

tapiwa
Monday, June 23, 2003

Years ago, I had a boss who insisted 1.00 had to be the first "complete" version (the company was selling this software before it was complete in the sense that the boss meant).

We started at 0.01.  When we got 0.99, it still wasn't complete according to him, because customers had thought up new stuff they wanted (to pay for, to be fair).  So then we went to 0.9901.  Eventually we got to 0.9999. As "complete" was a moving target, this still wasn't complete.  Then it happened again when we got 0.999999, and we were getting fed up of [and customers were confused by]  adding digits, so now we decided they were hex.


The boss eventually got moved (back) to marketing.  By the time he left, we were at something like 0.999B45.  Pretty much nobody, except the programmers, could understand the version numbers by then.

S. Tanna
Monday, June 23, 2003

maybe you should have slowed down on the "my penis/version number is bigger than yours" bandwagon. Back in the day, only major changes warranted a version number increase. Now, folk slap on a new verion number for  every service pack!

Linux kernel is still on 2.x.x. Red Hat is already shipping 9.0 ... wtf! Mandrake too.

Follow the OS version numbering. Not sure what your product is, but it helps if your product sounds as close to the latest OS as possible. Right now, all the rage is X

OS X, Windows XP ==> FUD Xp, Macromedia Mx, Widget X, etc. Silly marketing, but it seems to work. Walk into the average PC shop, and listen to Joe Average buying a machine....  "I want pentium 4, with windows XP, office XP, games XP" etc etc

I think the next one will be Xv (nice ring to it). Possibly Xi. Don't see Xx taking off. Seems too close to xxx.

tapiwa
Monday, June 23, 2003

Windows xXx staring Vin Deisel as Bill Gates.

www.MarkTAW.com
Monday, June 23, 2003

I agree with the version number inflation.  The 3 point version numbering system elimates much of the inflation:

major.minor.revision

Every release of the product is a increments the minor version.  Each bugfix or service pack release increments the revision version. 

The major version in incremented in two cases:

1) Major rewrite / non-backwards compatible update
2) When your minor release is already at 9.

Our major product is currently at 2.8.1.  I'm planning a major update that will eventually become version 3.0.  Version 2.x has been around for years but is essentially the same program with many additional features/fixes.

I like the Linux model of odd minor versions being for development and even for release.  But we don't have enough people testing the development versions to bother numbering them specifically.

Wayne Venables
Monday, June 23, 2003

Oh..  and to answer the question...

It should be 10.

Wayne Venables
Monday, June 23, 2003

10 is boring, but because it's boring, you may be able to pull it off in a fun way. How about using the letters instead of the numbers:

<myproduct> ten

I think you should do a full release for every minor revision from now on until you get to version like... 7,468 and then come back to us.

PS - what's wrong with 9.10?

www.MarkTAW.com
Monday, June 23, 2003


MyProduct Pro Gold

Marketing Goon
Monday, June 23, 2003

>>10 is boring, but because it's boring, you may be able to pull it off in a fun way. How about using the letters instead of the numbers:

Version 0A ?

Hexidecimal Guy
Monday, June 23, 2003

>>Now, folk slap on a new verion number for  every service pack!

And so they should!! How would you like to be the hapless support guy who had to deal with the fact that the "version 2.0" on a user's system could be version 2.0 plus none or more service packs and having no way to tell?

Andrew Reid
Tuesday, June 24, 2003

I had thought of hexidecimal, but 0B might seem like a step back from 9.

If they're dead set against 10, they'll come up with something. How about the initials of the product and X.

www.MarkTAW.com
Tuesday, June 24, 2003

Version 1.17&#960;e

Philo
Tuesday, June 24, 2003

Whoops. That should've been
1.17*pi*e

So much for extended ASCII codes...

Philo

Philo
Tuesday, June 24, 2003

If you wanted to actually print "&#960;" out to the screen, would you want it replaced by pi?

www.MarkTAW.com
Wednesday, June 25, 2003

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