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Memory after Internet-Usage

One of my friend tells me that he don't know anything. he knows where it is on the web/search etc..

Looking online and information  working with looked informatio n only has taken away the mental calculation about the information or the power to recall the information from memory.  This means lack of analysis if it's not available instantly.  It means no self-analysis of things.

This in my point a disadvantage of Internet and instant information availibility.

easy
Friday, June 20, 2003

They say the same thing about PDAs. PDAs "encourage" lack of short term memory for events and details.

Bored Bystander
Friday, June 20, 2003

Yes, the internet can encourage that sort of behavior.  But it's a dangerous fallacy to assume that use of the internet leads to "no self-analysis of things."  There's a big difference between "the internet can make you forgetful" and "the internet will make you forgetful."

Good warning.  But it's just as dangerous to go too far in the opposite direction.

Brent P. Newhall
Friday, June 20, 2003

The typical Greek theater visitor some 2.000 years ago is believed to be capable of remembering any single sentence of the drama/tragedy he saw. The same cannot be said about a medieval Earl. Is that a regression?

Same applies for traded (i.e. vocal) legends and myths vs. the invention of the printing press. Some (hi)story perhaps was lost, but reproduction via printed paper provides more accuracy and stability.

Johnny Bravo
Friday, June 20, 2003

Nobody here's read Donald Norman? I'm surprised.

There are two kinds of knowledge, the things you actually know, and the things you know how to put your fingers on easily.

www.MarkTAW.com
Friday, June 20, 2003

I can't wait for the day when they put Google on a small wireless chip, which can be planted inside the human brain :)


Friday, June 20, 2003

That sounds like TIA to me. Imagine being able to Google your own life.

Search: Keys

www.MarkTAW.com
Friday, June 20, 2003

that's an interesting concept:
Able to google your own life.

That would be really powerful.  A new concept about information in our daily life can be born out of that..

easy
Friday, June 20, 2003

Dear Johnny,
                    Where do you get your information about Ancient Greek theatre goers?

                    Would it not be more accurate to say that the average 21st century forum poster has the ablility to remember every urban myth, false statistic, and piece of misdigested information that he has ever come across?

                      In which respect he is probably no different from the average Ancient Greek theatre goer or Medieval Earl.

Stephen Jones
Friday, June 20, 2003

Ancient peoples had a *LOT* less 'bandwidth' to assimilate and a lot less complexity in life in general to pay attention to. No 'media' as such, far fewer facts, and almost no printed materials (pre-Gutenberg.)

Today, you can hardly talk to anyone who isn't multitasking at the same time that they're having a conversation. The rule seems to be that everyone cultivates an intense case of A.D.D.

Bored Bystander
Friday, June 20, 2003

It seems to me that people are making the mistake of presuming that a greater variety of media means a greater variety of messages.

Let's ask a simple question. How many of us feel that we have become much more intellectually lazy in the few years the internet has been in existence?

And how much of the intellectual decline we have noticed can be put down to ageing?

Stephen Jones
Friday, June 20, 2003

> The typical Greek theater visitor some 2.000 years ago is believed to be capable of remembering any single sentence of the drama/tragedy he saw. The same cannot be said about a medieval Earl. Is that a regression? <

So? I go to concerts and some musicals and sing along to every word. What's your point? I can probably sing along to 80% of the songs in my vast album/mp3 collection (I have well over 500 CD's). Being a musician, I also know a bit about the chord structure, meter, instrumentation, etc. of each.

How many people here can recite lines from any given point in The Matrix or Rocky Horror or The Princess Bride or Monty Python?

Weren't greek plays and minstrel songs somewhat repetitive? Along the lines of the 12 days of Christmas or 99 bottles of beer on the wall?

Don't you think a similar debate raged in Phebes when papyrus was introduced?

www.MarkTAW.com
Friday, June 20, 2003

It is said that the greek could recite every single word of the play after they visited it _once_.

But as Stephen already pointed out, I'm not able to provide historical evidence for my claimed knowledge on ancient Greece right now. Perhaps that statement is totally wrong - I will look into it tomorrow and fortunately provide accurate and dense sources.

Johnny Bravo
Friday, June 20, 2003

Mark, I was not trying to show that the initial claim in this thread yields true, but just the opposite. Obviously, I uttered not clear enough. My mistake.

Johnny Bravo
Friday, June 20, 2003

the internet is fantastic.

I don't have to know anything anymore!!!

Albert D. Kallal
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
kallal@msn.com
http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn

Albert D. Kallal
Friday, June 20, 2003

> It is said that the greek could recite every single word of the play after they visited it _once_. <

I want to know what this "it" is.

Haven't you realized that once we've gone off topic, we don't take into account what the orignal post was talking about?

Back to my point, I can recite for you any given line of 99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall and have only been to one recital of it.

www.MarkTAW.com
Friday, June 20, 2003

This is the first time Albert's sig is longer than his actual post :-)

Prakash S
Friday, June 20, 2003

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