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Writing a resume or cover letter? Reading an emplo

You may find this new application helpful:

http://www.dc.com/Insights/bullfighter/

Deloitte and Touche, a consulting company with a great deal of expertise in writing bafflegab, has released software for measuring the 'bull' in a document.

I find it most helpful for deciphering company mission statements. If a company's mission statement is so vague as to mean nothing, I steer clear of them.

http://www.braithwaite-lee.com

Reginald Braithwaite-Lee
Tuesday, June 17, 2003

I guess this means I should stop littering my resume with phrases from this website:

http://www.dack.com/web/bullshit.html

www.MarkTAW.com
Tuesday, June 17, 2003

That's hysterical! What a great link...

HeyCoolAid!
Tuesday, June 17, 2003

favourite bull word off the site.

  envisioneer

tapiwa
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

First try: architect real-time functionalities

What a great website, lol

Plutarck
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

Maybe I'm a stickler for proper English, but does it bother anyone else when "architect" is used as a verb?  What do architects do for a living?  They don't "architect", they "design".

gml
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

It was even greater when I discovered it 3 years ago at the height of the internet boom.

Someone needs to make a palm version for use during movies.

"We need to _ facilitate bricks-and-clicks applications _ in order to _ seize customized relationships _. The bottom line is we cannot survive unless we _ exploit collaborative experiences _. I've seen our competitors, and I can tell you they're preparing to _ unleash sexy interfaces _, so unless we can compete by _ utilizing innovative mindshare _, we don't stand a chance." (applause box lights up)

www.MarkTAW.com
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

Did anyone notice that that the bull sentances were a lot longer than the non bull sentances? How else am I going to pad my cover letters now?

www.MarkTAW.com
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

> does it bother anyone else when "architect"
> is used as a verb?

Yes, enough to make me spit venom on the subject occasionally. See my previous comments in these two threads (search for my name):

o My "space" pet-peeve
  26 December 2002
  http://discuss.fogcreek.com/joelonsoftware/default.asp?cmd=show&ixPost=23745

o Hiring coders versus architects
  13 February 2003
  http://discuss.fogcreek.com/joelonsoftware/default.asp?cmd=show&ixPost=28928

I got a little out of control on that second one. I was having a bad day.

Steven E. Harris
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

All nouns can be verbed. (trad)

Shakespeare did it: http://www.theatrehistory.com/british/shakespeare031d.html

Christopher Wells
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

Turning nouns into verbs is much more common in American English than British English.

Anyway, "architect" as a verb can probably be considered as jargon special to the software industry.

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

> Turning nouns into verbs is much more common in American English than British English.

There are so many regional and class-based differences in speech in Britain that I'd hesitate to generalise: I bussed it up to Glasgow once, and often went out pubbing. <g>

Christopher Wells
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

I've been clubbing, but never pubbing.

I suppose that's what you mean by a class difference :)

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

now we know what consultants REALLY DO :-)

Prakash S
Wednesday, June 18, 2003

Yes, they come up with clever programs and send people to Mexico as part of a massive PR campaign when the economy goes down the tubes.

www.MarkTAW.com
Thursday, June 19, 2003

As Calvin said "Verbing wierds language."

Mr Jack
Thursday, June 19, 2003

>>I've been clubbing, but never pubbing

Clubbing?  Who did you club?  And, to death?  Oh, you meant going out to clubs!

I guess it gives new meaning to the term "clubbed to death".

gml
Friday, June 20, 2003

The fact that Briton's favourite recreations have changed since the time of Boudicea from "clubbing" as a transitive verb to "clubbing" as an intransitive verb is some small sign of progress.

Stephen Jones
Friday, June 20, 2003

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