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Thanks for the mid-day sleepiness responses...

First of all, I'm glad to hear that it's not just me!

I've actually tried many of the things you guys suggested.  I don't normally eat large lunches (only on occasion when going out with groups), I'm not on any medications and at most I drink a couple of cups of coffee a day, which is my only caffeine intake.  However, one thing I haven't tried is taking the walk outside, so I may incorporate this strategy along with my sleeping-on-the-jon-for-10-minutes strategy (also glad to hear I'm not the only one who does *that* too :) ).  Another thing is that, it really doesn't matter how much sleep I get the night before.  Be it 8 hours or 5 hours, I just start getting drowsy around the 2-3pm mark. It's not bone weary exhaustion or anything.  It's just  constant yawning and inability to concentrate.  However I think having proper sleep the night before does increase my *average* productivity throughout the day.

IMO, there are a lot of seemingly little things like this that can have an extremely dramatic effect on worker productivity that's just being overlooked due to conventional thinking (ie, working 30 hours straight is the way to get great things done).  Also, I'm pretty sure there are a few mutants who don't experience this (supposedly, Napoleon only need like 3 hours of sleep per night) and thus, this issue may go totally unnoticed by them.

BTW, my vote for best suggestion goes to the guy who suggested throwing paper clips on the floor and then fall asleep on the floor, pretending to pick them up. 

Crimson
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

Are you obese, perhaps?  See:

http://www.psu.edu/ur/NEWS/news/obesitysleep.html

J. D. Trollinger
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

JD:

No, I'm not obese either.  I'm in pretty good shape (though I could drop a few lbs to cut down on my 33 inch waistline) and excercise regularly.

Crimson
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

A couple cups of coffee a day could easily account for your drop in energy in the afternoon, especially if you drink them in the morning.  Caffeine, like sugar, is a short term energy boost, but after it wears off your energy takes a big drop.  You might not want to dismiss that as a potential cause so easily.

Mike McNertney
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

I think another overlooked aspect of getting sleepy is to not open the office window to let in fresh air.

Some year ago, when I was fatter, I went to the toilet, hold my keys on one finger and began to sleep. As soon as you fall into the deep sleep, the keys fall down and you awake by the noise. Astonishingly, this is exactly the right time to awake, to not feel sleepy anymore. Just try it.

Coding4Food
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

Coding4Fun,

that is an interesting theory, i am going to try it sometime...

Prakash S
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

Sometimes something interesting happens and I'm immediately wide away... Adreneline maybe. I kind of wonder sometimes if the monotony of every day work in a cubicle or similar, lack of human interaction is just counter to how we're hard wired.

Having something to look foward to certianly helps. Similar to not being able to sleep the night before a big event, programming in small satisfaction events at different milestones can be a bit of a help.

Another way to 'program' yourself is to associate two events. For example, I listen to books on tape when I go bike riding. Now, I get lazy and even when I want to go bike riding, I procrastinate. So I just put on my walkman and somehow listening to the same thing I listen to when I'm bike riding gets my energy up, and somehow automates in my brain the process of getting th ebike off the rack, etc.

Maybe you can do the same thing. When you're "in the zone" listen to some music you like. Always the same music, or maybe any music in the same environment will do. Then to get into the zone, try listening to the music. It's not the music itself, it's the environment - you in your cubicle with your headphones on listening to music - that you begin to associate with a certian mindset.

Might be worth experimenting with if you can listen to music.

www.marktaw.com
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

You're not depressed are you?  That's one of the symptoms.  Made we wonder since you said it doesn't matter how many hours of sleep you get the night before.

        
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

Just one other thought. Try doing a search for Glycemic Index. Most people know that eating sugar can cause you to get sleepy and tired. Your body sends a rush of insulin into your bloodstream to handle the sugar and this gives you the sugar crash feeling. New studies show that many other foods can cause this same reaction, and some foods, like potatoes, are worse then pure sugar. I used to have the same problem, and now that I avoid certain foods, I hardly ever get sleepy durning the day, even if I haven't had enough sleep.

Bill
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

What's one of the symptoms of depression? Having a hard time motivating myself to go bike riding?

Bike riding, at least the way I do it, is a major commitment. I go for several hours & over many miles through a couple of boroughs. Though it is a chore to get everything together.

Am I depressed? I don't think so.  Like most people, I have different moods throughout the week. Bike riding is a bit of a break in the normal routine, and it takes a little effort to get started.

I think the question is, how many people actually get out that way at least once a week?

I've concidered that I may be a little hypoglycemic (sp?). However, I don't get tired if I haven't eaten for a while. I am a lot more sensitive to foods than most people I know... basically everyone that I know, so I know something's up with my metabolism.

www.marktaw.com
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

... unless that question wasn't aimed at me ...

www.marktaw.com
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

You need those spectacles with eyes painted on them. So it looks like you have your eyes open when you are sleeping.

Homer Simpson wears them on when episode of the Simpsons when marge is talking to him.

Matthew Lock
Thursday, April 17, 2003

Could just be genetic:

e.g. variant of http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nm/journal/v5/n9/full/nm0999_1062.html

Just me (Sir to you)
Thursday, April 17, 2003

day sleepiness could be a form of narcosepsy....I have it; I could have had a wonderful night's and within a few hours, my eyes are dropping shut with no power to keep them open;  this can happen while driving, which is very dangerous.  I don't go many places anymore because this happens. 

rose anne
Friday, April 30, 2004

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