Fog Creek Software
Discussion Board




Best CVS Implementation

Hi,

I'm working on a project where we are considering using CVS instead of Visual Source Safe.

The team's responsibilities are shared between developing a fairly basic Java Servlet application and developing .xsl files.

Our requirements are that the CVS tool would hopefully:
1. Integrate with a Java IDE - WebSphere Studio or IDEA IntelliJ.
2. Be fairly easy to use, so that the transition from Source Safe is gentle.

All users will be using WinNT, Win2k or WinXP. CVSNT will act as the server.

From what I can tell there seem to be many implementations around the place, all of which are in various stages of development, etc and was wondering if anyone had some clear idea of the kind of client we should use so as I can avoid wandering down too many dark alleys.

Thanks in advance.

Walter Rumsby
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

Lots of people recommend TortoiseCVS. It won't integrate with your IDE, but it integrates very nicely with Explorer, which is the next best thing :-)

Ivan-Assen Ivanov
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

tbh, i don't think it is so important if you use one tool or another (but my own preference is pvcs), but rather how you use it (you may insert a smutty joke here if you wish). if the team members are muppets then the best scm sw is not going to help. but ton answer the question, i agree with the tortoise recommendation.

nope
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

A slight problem with TortoiseCVS is that you still need another tool for accessing the CVS logs in a decent manner. Does anyone have (simple) recommendations?

Frederik Slijkerman
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

Well, if you use Netbeans or Forte for your IDE, they have great CVS integration built right in. Nicest feature is that you can see a graphical diff of your working file with any previous version.

Matt Christensen
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

I use TortoiseCVS (integrates with Explorer) and WinCVS for all my development.  You can do 95% of what you want in TortoiseCVS; for advanced stuff you just need to launch WinCVS.  They are both available for download from the same place.

Run, don't walk, away from Visual Source Safe...

Wayne Venables
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

I haven't used CVS, but we use Perforce at work and I love it. I have had to use Visual SourceSafe in the past and it sucks. Perforce is really nice, has great support for code branching and merging, has command-line and GUI tools, and integrates well with Microsoft Visual Studio.

Banana Fred
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

I'm not convinced that integrated CVS into a team's favorite IDE is a good thing.  At my work, most use the WinCVS client.  And they combine it with incremental builds.  I'm almost terrified to download a clean sourcetree because I know almost all of them didn't install TCL, which gives them the option to see all the files they modified at a glance.

If your CVS client can do this, all the best wishes to you.

Janos M.
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

On a tangent, I've always been curious as to what version control system(s) Microsoft uses.

I'm sure it can't be source safe. 

Malachi Brown
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

The article in [ http://www.usenix.org/events/usenix-win2000/invitedtalks/lucovsky_html/ ] discusses what used to be and what currently is happening in Microsoft.

Basically, they had an awful system (which, legend tells, was a home-grown system that ran on OS/2 machines no one dared touch because they worked), outgrew it, and switched to SourceDepot, which is a (possibly customized for Microsoft) version of Perforce.

Ori Berger
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

Actually I did see some CVS implementations (WinCVS) that suggested downloading Perl and Tcl, but I couldn't see an obvious reason why I should do this.

From what I gather without these tools I won't be able to see the change logs (which is a bad thing), but I will be able to use the client (i.e. to verify that the CVS server is working, etc.). Is that correct?

Walter Rumsby
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

Perl and TCL just parse the history and messages of the CVS repository. They are not required. Some tools that I use are viewcvs (web viewing), winCVS, cvs2html.pl, cvs2cl.pl, log_accum.pl (commit emails).

Jeb
Wednesday, April 17, 2002

As I understand WinCVS, there is exactly one great thing you get for installing TCL -- the Fast Search Modified option.  When you right-click on a directory and select that option, you get a recursive listing of all files you modified underneath it.

If you can get this functionality in some other way using WinCVS (aside from writing your own script), I'd be surprised, and glad to be corrected.

Janos M.
Thursday, April 18, 2002

I've used CVS, PVCS amd VSS, and I know people disagree, but I have found VSS to be superior. Its highly intuitive, integrates to VB and C perfectly and just plain works.

Tony
Thursday, April 18, 2002

When committing with TortoiseCVS you get a recursive listing all the files you've added, modified, and removed from the project.  Very handly.  I rarely, if ever, have to use WinCVS. 

I also have cvsweb installed (which is somewhat integrated with TortoiseCVS) for viewing the changelogs and diffs.

It does take some knowledge to setup CVS the way you want you want it.  I have to edit configuration files anytime I want to add a project; but then I have a complicated but very handy setup.

Visual Source Safe just works until something goes wrong.  (or until somebody checks something out and then goes on holidays!)

Wayne Venables
Thursday, April 18, 2002

I don't like WinCVS but I can't really describe why.  It just doesn't make me comfortable.  I haven't been able to find a real "community" surrounding it and they hide some things in weird places.

I use the command-line cvs under Cygwin.  Works great, never surprises me.  (and actually, given how simple CVS is I never really understood why a front-end was necessary.)

Scott Evans
Thursday, April 18, 2002

EclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipseEclipse

http://www.eclipse.org/

Eclipse
Thursday, April 18, 2002

We use CVS here.  It is quite straight forward.  The Best part is where I copy my current sandbox to a temp directory, do a complete checkout, and a complete build.  Since I've aold copy, I don't worry if CVS is screwy.  I make it a point to only keep one old copy around, to keep from doing my own revision control.

IDEA works very nicely with CVS.  I use a combination of command line and integrated CVS.

Adam
Thursday, April 18, 2002

Sorry "Eclipse",

At the risk of sounding religious I didn't enjoy the Eclipse experience at all, the money I spent on an IntelliJ license was very well spent - it's very intuitive, something I can't say about Eclipse or WebSphere Studio.

Walter Rumsby
Thursday, April 18, 2002

I personally like Netbeans' integration with CVS.  Setting it up is snap and the integration is simple and straightforward.  I'm a believer in KISS and this fits the bill.  I could rant on about all the great features of Netbeans but that's beyond the scope of this thread :), but I'll just say that I've looked around many times for a better IDE then Netbeans and have always come up empty handed.  It's a bit slow, but on high end hardware it's plenty fast enough.

Dave Bixler
Tuesday, April 23, 2002

*  Recent Topics

*  Fog Creek Home