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Current Date.

This might be a really stupid question, here it goes anyway:

I have some software apps that are trial version, the ones which would expire after 30 days types. I keep changing the system date every week to a set date.

Now I need to use the actual current date in a macro in excel.

What are my options?

Is there any way to sync my excel sheet with any website that gives me the current date?

or

Can I generate the future dates in excel and use it from that?

any ideas?

-----------------------------------------------------------

What do you guys if you want to use trial versions beyond the trial date ?

thanks,

Prakash S
Monday, March 24, 2003

Buy it.

GiorgioG
Monday, March 24, 2003

Amazing the lengths cheap skates will go to - to avoid paying for $30 shareware programs.

Matthew Lock
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Loser, doesn't want even to pay $30 for some piece of software ...

FooBar
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Dear Prakash S!

It is morally wrong to cheat the trial versions of software by setting your system date back. It might also be illegal in your country.

That said, I can tell that I'm also the kind of guy who does not want to pay lots of money for software that I don't think is worth the price.

But I've solved that problem in a cheap, efficient, legal and "morally correct" way: I use Open Source Software (licensed under the GPL for example).

Martin
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Dear Prakash,
                      There is NO shareware that time expires after 30 days that is worth the trouble of installing in the first place. Even for Windows you will find there is freeware available that will serve your purpose.

                      You will also find that apart from MS Office and a graphics suite there is nothing else you need to pay for. If you are doing programming then maybe it is different, but if you're going to break the law do it properly and buy a pirate version.

                      And if you really want to disable the 30 day limit then don't use the system clock; go into the registry and find where they store the flag and change it. You are a programmer after all. Use something of what you've learned at Uni.

Stephen Jones
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

> You are a programmer after all. Use something of what
> you've learned at Uni.

Pitty you didn't go to any courses on ethics.

Matthew Lock
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Prakash,

The answer you seek is on the front page of this site: Use VMWare.

I agree with the others though; if something is that useful, buy it.

Justin
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

there are a bunch of atomic clock time servers out there - i don't know if they have a publicly accessable webservice you can poll, but here are some of the time servers:
129.6.15.28
129.6.15.29
132.163.4.101
132.163.4.102
132.163.4.103
128.138.140.44
63.149.208.50
131.101.1.10
216.200.93.8
208.184.49.9
205.188.185.33

i hope this helps.

nathan
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

If I had to buy it I wouldn't be asking thius question would I?

Call me what you want 'cos I frankly don't care, but I don't want to blow $$$ on software which I use on and off.

Stephen: I don't want to buy a pirated version, I belive that is morally wrong:-)

Thanks nathan, I will see what I can do with it.

Prakash S
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Prakash,

I think you're absolutely right.

It is a remarkably stupid question.

Kyralessa
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Prakash - if you're setting your system clock and programming around it, then obviously the software is worth *something* to you. If it's overpriced then either find a cheaper version that does the same thing, negotiate with the author (if it's not Microsoft or CA), or write your own and sell it for cheaper.

Philo

Philo
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Philo,

Yeah it is wort something to me. The one I would like to buy is the cheapest version, I did think of writing the software myself - but the time/ cost factors do not seem favourable.

Prakash S
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Out of curiosity, what does this software do?

Kyralessa
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Prakash

What's your time worth to you? Are you really going to find a solution to this that won't take several hours of your time to implement? Not to mention the time you take to reset your clock and deal with the side-effects of the wrong time.

David Clayworth
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Let me make things a little clearer:

I believe that a company puts up shareware software so that they can sell more software.

Advantages to the company:
1.)If I like the software I am going to use more of it.
2.)I recommend this software to the company I work for / Friends/ Colleagues/ etc – word of mouth advertising is the best by far.
3.)More people using the application result in a larger pool of people with that skill.

Disadvantages to the company:
1.) I keep changing the system date and do not buy the software – company loses revenue on one license.
2.) If the number of people doing this is more than the number of companies/people who buy the software, then it is a real loss for the company.

If any company wanted to stop this they would go ahead and do something about it. They don’t and the reason is the advantages outweigh the disadvantages.

Prakash S
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

David,

It is really not worth my time reinventing the wheel. I am looking at various alternatives but am sure none will take more than an hour (MAX) to implement.

Time taken to reset clock 7 seconds. Comes to 6 minutes a year. As of now I don’t have any side effects of wrong time.

Prakash S
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Prakash - don't you write software for a living? No feeling for the golden rule?

I'll be honest - I "overused" a lot of shareware in the past, but since I've been doing commercial development I really feel guilty about doing it anymore - enough so that I pay for any software I find myself using regularly.

Not trying to really "accuse" you, just curious.

Philo

Philo
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

I agree with you Prakash, but don't forget that peer pressure is the bad-cop part of shareware. ;)  Nicer to flagellate yourself than dl a simple crack.

Tj
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Note to self: Never pay for software written by Prakash S.

dmooney
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

What does the software do that's so valuable you can't live without it, but so worthless that you couldn't possibly pay for it?  Tell us, the curiosity is killing me.

Kyralessa
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Prakash, I would never hire you. Not because of trying to cheat on other software developers, but because of asking this kind of question in public. Even if you want to trick the software, this isn't the place ...

A
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

It's not just that he asked such a ridiculous question in public (on what is largely a software developer's forum for crying out loud), but the pathetic moralizing: I respect someone who says "Yeah well...too bad" to a greater degree than those who moralize and justify every criminal action ("oh well I only robbed that old cuz she had it coming! And I'll bet getting by with a little less helped her enjoy life! I did her a favour!"). Go to Slashdot and join the P2P pirates justifying their actions, Prakash.

Morally Indignant
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Yeah, I should have been more specific. Pirating against fellow software developers is the first reason I won't hire Prakash, but I'm referrning mainly to the behavior which shows the lack of judgement and intelligence.

A
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

I've sadly noticed prakash's phenomena a lot. Poor, stupid people with a lot of computer experience get this weird attitude where they aren't going to pay for software, ever. and that's their right, god damnit. and they will waste huge amounts of time, to avoid spending a $100, or even $30 license fee... News flash: if you work in software, and don't have an extra $30, you really need to re-evaluate your situation.

I had a sysadmin friend once who just could not stop being cagey. He wanted me to burn him my OSX CD  so he wouldn't have to buy it. for $110. He billed out about $100/hr yet couldn't afford to buy a $110 CD...a CD he was using for a WORK machine. anyway. he wouldn't stop hassling me. so i said that if he truly would not pay money for it, that i had just read about a hack where you could burn an OSX upgrade disk without some file, and it would magically be a full install, rather than an upgrade. (the upgrade was about $20, instead of $110)

However, the Compusa on Market didn't have the upgrade. But a compUSA in San Jose did. So he drove 2 hours each way to buy this disk.  Then spent however much time re-burning it. So. he saved $80. but. spent an entire day (worth $900 at his going rate) just so he didn't have to buy the CD at the first compUSA he went to. amazing.

I agree with the last few posters, in that however stupid the actual act prakash is trying to commit is, posting about it, UNDER YOUR OWN NAME, is far stupider.  Prakash, don't you yet realize that everything you say on an internet forum is going to be indexed throughout eternity?

Like this, for instance...where you give your full name and current city of residence:

http://discuss.fogcreek.com/newyork/default.asp?cmd=show&ixPost=188&ixReplies=31

I can look at groups.google.com and find out that I had a serious USENET addiction during the 2nd semester of my sophomore year in college. I certainly wish I would have thought a little more about what I was posting about...

choppy
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

"Hi, guys. Can you tell me how to steal your stuff?"

There really has to be something wrong (or perhaps just stupid) with asking developers how to steal from other developers.

andrew m
Tuesday, March 25, 2003

I'd hire him just because it would piss off all the self righteous wankers with sticks up the arses posting on here.

And the horse you rode in on
Wednesday, March 26, 2003

Dear "And the horse you rode in on"!

Then please be sure to double Prakash's salary every time he steals from his employer (YOU!) - that would REALLY piss us off!

Ergonomic creature
Wednesday, March 26, 2003

As requested by Matthew Lock and others, test questions on Ethics 101

Question 1: You are an impoverished CS graduate student just getting by in New York City, and inadvertently post on an internet forum the fact that you sometimes use a piece of shareware that it would be a bit of a stretch to buy outright at present. Nearly all of the other forum members (mainly British and American) launch into a violent attack against you, accusing you of being a lower form of animal life than Saddam Hussein's tapeworms.  Do you think?

a) This shows the moral superiority of Anglo-Saxon culture. Not one of these posters ever, when a student, downloaded a pirated MP3, photocopied a chapter from a textbook and they all think Oscar is something to do with Hollywood. If they found they needed a piece of software they would get the money cleaning the sewers, serving up the sewers at MacDonald’s, or pimping their kid brother, but under no circumstances would they ever break copyright.

b) This shows that Americans and Brits are a load of nauseating hypocrites who, when students, treated intellectual property laws a marginally less relevant than the Book of Leviticus, and now that they all have high paying jobs, and get their software paid for by the employer anyway, decide to puff themselves up at your expense.

c) This shows that American and Brits are no more nauseatingly hypocritical than the rest of the world; it's just that their greater access to the Internet allows them to indulge in it more.

d) This doesn't show anything at all. It's so long since the other posters were at university that they never had to face the dilemma; they thought shareware was borrowing someone's pencil sharpener.

Answers on a postcard (please use recycled paper, and don't dream of recycling the stamp).

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, March 26, 2003

Prakash... it seems that it would have been easier to say, "the system clock on my computer is very bad - the date is never correct.  anyone know a webservice I can access from Excel to get the correct date & time?"

People might have been willing to actually answer your question then.

nathan
Wednesday, March 26, 2003

Nathan,
              I don't think you've understood Prakash's problem. In order to fool a time-limited shareware program he has put his system clock back a few years. Unfortunately he now needs to have it running correctly for an Excel macro he wants on his system.

              So, unless he installs a second copy of the OS using a boot manager, he can have the macro running or the shareware running but not both.

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, March 26, 2003

I understand the problem.  He needs to get the time from a webservice, or sync the spreadsheet somewhere online.  I was suggesting a different way he could ask the question and get the same result, without receiving the wrath of the software developers that don't condone tricking the shareware.

nathan
Wednesday, March 26, 2003

Sorry, me being stupid; the thread had progressed so far I didn't check his original question. I thought you were just telling him how to get his system clock back up.

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, March 26, 2003

a note on stealing software, music, movies, etc.:

I steal music. I steal software. I don't 'borrow', 'trial', or whatever, I steal it. I'm not going to change, and I realize that it's wrong. And I won't try to justify it: I can't, and I don't try.

I get annoyed when people try to act all high and mighty and claim that what they do isn't bad, or that it's even good. I'm not going to lecture you about doing it, but you really oughtn't have any illusions about what you're doing.

some anon. guy
Wednesday, March 26, 2003

Who's stealing anything ... they've made it too easy to connect to the internet these days, since there's so many people who can't make a simple distinction between theft and copyright infringement floating about ...

And the horse you rode in on
Wednesday, March 26, 2003

Horse rode in on:

Call it what you like, but don't deny that the author deserves compensation. I call it stealing and if you want to debate that, go right ahead, but I shant.

The author says they want $40 for a product. If you don't give it to them, you shouldn't use the product.

I do anyway, and I have no illusions about it being wrong. But don't say that since it's 'copyright infringment' that you're not cheating the author out of money that he should be getting for the product.

I'm not going to stand here and tell you all that you are going to hell for depriving an artist of $2 (you may be, but that's besides the point). But don't go around saying that the author of the software should be thanking you, because you're free advertising or some bullshit. Just be honest about what you do (or have the decency to hide it). But don't claim it's right.

some anon. guy
Wednesday, March 26, 2003

Dear anon guy,
                        How about being unconfused yourself and call it not paying instead of stealing.

Stephen Jones
Thursday, March 27, 2003

> not paying instead of stealing

What's the difference?

I always thought the definition of stealing was taking something that doesn't belong to you. Unregistered shareware doesn't belong to you, therefore "taking" it by thawting the time-out feature is stealing.

Matthew Lock
Thursday, March 27, 2003

This could be an interesting debate on how to deal with shareware.  Does anyone think it would be better for Prakash to just crack his programs instead of giving himself problems by keeping his date set falsely?  Cracks exist for common programs.

I believe Microsoft accepted piracy in China because they couldn't really afford to pay, and at least they were getting hooked on Windows.  Also, Adobe's products are heavily pirated by those who want to become proficient, so they can find jobs and purchase the software legally.

anon
Thursday, March 27, 2003

Dear Matthew,
                      Your certainty is touching. The difference between taking forty dollars from your purse and not sending you forty dollars for your shareware is that in the first case you have lost forty dollars and in the second case you haven't.

                      Now please don't start about how there would be no intellectual property created if nobody paid, how you are a programmer and crackers are taking the bread out of you mouth and other such stuff. It is BORING. and that is why I am proposing we don't use it at all in this thread.

                        There are cases where not paying for software is the equivalent of hiring somebody to clean your car and then driving off without paying him. At the other extreme there are cases where paying is the equivalent of giving in to the blackmail of the bus driver who taking you from Cairo to Amman stops by a tea stall in the Middle of the desert and announces he's not gioing any further until you give him a tip that satisfies him on top of the ticket you paid the company for.

                          This is not the subject of the thread, and let's avoid it by sticking to the facts: he's not paying for shareware after the evaluation period is up.

Stephen Jones
Thursday, March 27, 2003

I cant believe this thread has even gotten this far.  It is silly to argue against a single user stealing software.  The only reason I know what I know today is because of all of the software I got for free from fellow geeks.  How else can you learn??

Prakash, next time do these things in the following order to get your software for free:

1.)  Get Kazaa Lite and search for it there.
2.)  Go on IRC, learn the best "warez" channels and find it there.
3.)  Last resort, go to http://astalavista.box.sk and search for a crack.

One last word of advice, only run EXE's that you get from any of the above places in VMWare or on a system that has disposable data.

Wayne
Thursday, March 27, 2003

I will admit however that Prakash needs to work on his netiquette.  It was inconsiderate to post this question here. 

I put this one right up there with the guy who posted ("Is Fogbugz even needed" and pointing to some crappy free bug tracking tool)

Wayne
Thursday, March 27, 2003

Speaking of piracy and hypocrisy (which I think we were), there's a large magazine publisher near here who spend large articles saying how piracy is baaad, so they can keep the software distributors sweet and keep advertising revenue coming in.

Then on the next page they have an article like 'how to sort out your blurry snapshots in Photoshop 7' or 'how to use channel compressors in Cubase SX'.

Like someone who's just spent hundreds on a piece of software is going to buy a magazine for help rather than read the manual they got in the box...

More to the point, would you go and spend half a month's salary on something you didn't have the faintest clue on how to use?


Thursday, March 27, 2003

Why do you think it's unusual for the how-to articles? First, do you think people read the manuals that come with software? Most of them have been pretty bad.

Second, most of the software I buy doesn't come with a real manual anymore (one of the solutions to problem #1...), usual only a flyer about how wonderful the software is. A good magazine article about a specific topic is useful to most of the people who really bought the software.

RocketJeff
Thursday, March 27, 2003

"More to the point, would you go and spend half a month's salary on something you didn't have the faintest clue on how to use? "

If you only make 1200 a month, why are you even thinking about buying photoshop (which is $600 list price)?

And if one of the cheaper alternatives (link the Gimp) won't work for you, you can always find a way to be legal for less money - like buying an older version from someone and then buying the upgrade (if you *have* to have the latest version).

RocketJeff
Thursday, March 27, 2003

I think you'll find second hand software is dodgy ground as well.


Friday, March 28, 2003

And your reasons for saying this?

RocketJeff
Friday, March 28, 2003

The license agreement? Ever read it?


Saturday, March 29, 2003

Ignoring the fact that you post one line comments with little information or supporting comemnts, I'll actually reply.

First, there is the 'right of first sale' that covers this.

Second, if you look at most license agreements, they do specifically allow you to transfer the license to someone else if you don't keep a copy for yourself (i.e. you have to give everything). The only software that I've seen that hasn't allowed this is the Trancenders test prep software. I'm sure that there are others, but I've not run into them.

RocketJeff
Saturday, March 29, 2003

Oh.


Saturday, March 29, 2003

Howto articles in magazines are usually either so general that they are worthless, or so specialised that they need, specifically, the full version of the software - not Package N-1, not Package's $100 cut down version. Package N.

If you can't afford the full version, you have no good reason for buying it, like you say. So, why or how would you have access to software that you can't afford and don't have the first clue how to use?

But still, the magazines still print the 'how to use the latest fantastic feature in Package N' articles, pretending they're either decent proper editorial (and not advertorial at all because that's against magazine policy) and they are, of course, *definitely not* incitement to go on a sharing network to find the software in question because piracy is bad.

Now don't get me started on the fact that these supposedly independent, editorially independent magazines' average review score for any product is 9 out of 10.


Saturday, March 29, 2003

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