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GPA cutoff in interviews?

I have heard that in some interviews that ask for transcripts, they have a minimum GPA Cutoff.Does the same thing happen for a junior dev. position with 2+ years experience?

PC
Wednesday, February 19, 2003

not if you are applying for the same position as an entry level graduate.

even if they ask you that question it will not be a high priority question (unless one has a really low GPA)

my guess is they will be more concerned about what you have learned in the past 2 years, and how you can contribute to their efforts.

Prakash S
Thursday, February 20, 2003

I would make it a high priority question because even with all of the shortcomings of our grading system, it still at least gives you something to base a decision on. 

Your GPA does speak to your work effort and in many cases intellegence.  It is not a direct corelation between those things but it does point you in the right direction. 

If you have 10 college grads interviewing for the same posistion and all took the same classes and all have the same interview experience (based on same classes/projects etc), you have to have something else to base your decision on. 

Matt Watson
Thursday, February 20, 2003

I think that GPA is an interesting metric, but definitely not one on which I would base a hiring decision. First of all, few companies care that much about it once you've completed a few years of work (about 3) or after you've left your first job (again, after about 3 years). After this period, your work experience is much more relevant.

However.. some companies, particularly high-end consulting shops and boutique firms, will insist that you went to a top-tier school. I have more than 15 years of experience on a constant growth curve and yet I was just recently asked by a firm for college transcripts, and they also asked me to check off which school(s) I went to on their master list of schools. Guess what? Their list only contained top-shelf private schools.

Personally, I can tell you that about 25% of my graduating undergrad class had 4.0 averages. This was unusual and totally skewed the natural ability to even gain an interview with campus recruiters for the rest of the class. I had less than a 4.0 (but still cum laude) and was already working as an engineer for 2+ years during school. Even though my experience was better than the whole class, most employers wouldn't talk to me because I didn't get the 4.0. Ever since, I have weighed personality and experience more heavily than education (not that I don't weigh education).

Tom Fairlie
Thursday, February 20, 2003

From what I've heard from people who actually do hiring:  The recruiter will look at your GPA first, and that'll decide which pile you're on:  Very Interesting, Mildly Interesting, or Don't Bother.

If you don't have the minimum GPA, you may still get called, but the odds are less likely than if you do have the minimum GPA.

And for those who complain about this, look at it from the recruiter's perspective:  You need to hire somebody immediately.  You're losing $500 a day because problems aren't being fixed.  You advertise a position and you get 200 resumes.  How are you going to separate the gold from the dross?  The GPA is a good first step.

Brent P. Newhall
Thursday, February 20, 2003

Wow.

Six years of commercial work, several dozen job interviews, and nobody has EVER asked about my GPA.

Philo

Philip Janus
Thursday, February 20, 2003

If any company asks you about your GPA, they're too stupid to matter anyways. Don't work for them. Companies that pay attention to your ability NOW, and what you can accomplish today, are more likely to be successful corporations. (Case in point: Microsoft)

John Rosenberg
Thursday, February 20, 2003

Agreed John.  Personally I can't see how any corrolation can be drawn between GPA and work ethic.  GPA measures your efforts, work wise, when you're paying, while work ethic is your efforts when you're being paid.  2 completely different situations.

I'd argue that GPA showing passion for the work doesn't sail either.  Perhaps the low GPA is due to skipping all the BS courses needed to graduate to work on personal projects relating to the desired field.  Perhaps it's due to money issues (There's only so many hours in a day and money will always take precidence over homework).  You get the drift.

As for being a measure of intellect, I'd have to disagree there too.  I knew some truely stupid people that earned 4.0s through hard work, LOTS of help, and shear sweat.  They certainly weren't the brightest bulb of the bunch to be certain, but they worked their butts off for those points...

So perhaps that's what GPA really shows.  The abilities of an employee to kiss ass and do whatever it takes for minimal reward.  I suppose that's a valuable quality, though I think creative thinking and actually being able to do the work in a timely manner matter more.

These days, with the filtering software available to recruiters, it doesn't make sense to limit your candidate classifications based on one variable of a candidate.  Seems like an elitist attitude, which will only get your company so far in the tech world.

If you can't tell this is a pet peev of mine and the main reason I don't even include GPA on my resumes.  Probably hurts my prospects, but do I really want to work for someone who's going to pre-judge my abilities in software on some arbitrary score composed of hundreds of topics awarded by an equal number of professors, all of which have their own agendas, preferences, and grading habits?

Lucas Goodwin
Friday, February 21, 2003

Why would a potential employer ask you for your GPA?  Isn't it on your resume?

Brent P. Newhall
Friday, February 21, 2003

(The above comment is directed at Philo.)

Brent P. Newhall
Friday, February 21, 2003

I have never put either of my GPA's on my resume, and I have never had a problem getting interviews. This whole "GPA on your resume" thing is bizarre to me...

Philo

Philip Janus
Friday, February 21, 2003

When making my first resume in college, they told me putting the GPA on the resume was important. I thought, "but my GPA is terrible! what can I do?" So I lied. Turns out most people don't check! Sorry to all those guys who studied hard for 4 years, but I got the job! Turns out they don't check that stuff! :)

xyz
Friday, February 21, 2003

xyz, you do realize that it's better to just leave the GPA off (which is what I did) than outright lie (which has a tendancy to catch up with you later)

Of course, that might explain the idiocy of some people who I've interviewed who had good GPAs and no brains.

I tend to be extra hard and quite unforgiving to canidates who list a high GPA on their resume, make them prove that they did, in fact, earn those grades instead of lying or cheating or forgetting everything after the test.

flamebait sr.
Friday, February 21, 2003

I didn't "outright lie." I just dropped all the classes unrelated to programming from the GPA calculation. Who the hell cares I got a D in music appreciation? I doubt you would have grilled me on the birthdate of mozart.

xyz
Saturday, February 22, 2003

I always thought the first part of your academic qualifications  the recruiter looked at was what university you went to.

Stephen Jones
Saturday, February 22, 2003

xyz wrote, "I didn't "outright lie." I just dropped all the classes unrelated to programming from the GPA calculation."

The GPA is an average of all your grades.  That's why it stands for "Grade Point Average."  Dropping some classes from the calculation makes your GPA a lie by definition.

Brent P. Newhall
Monday, February 24, 2003

I have no problems with somebody leaving their GPA off of their resume.  My question is:  Other than having a low GPA, why not put your GPA on your resume?

(As I typed the above paragraph, I realized that I didn't include my GPA on my resume.  I just put down that I graduated on the Dean's List.  But the question stands.)

Brent P. Newhall
Monday, February 24, 2003

I've gotten a few resumes (yes the liar is in a position to hire people now) that have SAT scores on them. What do you think of that practice?

xyz
Monday, February 24, 2003

"I've gotten a few resumes (yes the liar is in a position to hire people now) that have SAT scores on them. What do you think of that practice? "

The Wall Street Investment bank I work at explicitly asked my SAT scores on my job application.

Joe Shmoe
Tuesday, February 25, 2003

Did they ask for proof of your score of 1700? :)

xyz
Tuesday, February 25, 2003

I have a friend who over-estimated his major GPA and got a job... sigh.  I am one of the unfortunate who had some growing up to do in college and didnt quite make the 3.0 mark.  I think the only time GPA really matters is in obtaining your first job, hopefully ;)  Even though I graduated from a good university (U of Michigan), I'm still having a very hard time finding a job w/ my 2.7 GPA.  It seems to me that having that 3.0 or better is pretty golden. *cry*

Paul B.
Friday, March 19, 2004

I have 4 years of experience, a Bachelors, and a Masters Degree (unrelated fields) I recently was hired by a large engineering consulting firm, and did not put my GPA on my resume (nor was it ever brought up). However it was asked for on the application they made me fill out the day of my interview, I stupidly curved it on my undergraduate work so I would not get filtered by HR. Now 2 weeks after being hired they are asking for transcripts and GPA for our Employee profiles. What do you think will be the consequences?

Jared Katze
Thursday, May 13, 2004

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