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The bare minimum for a Mac developer

I plan to port an application I developed on Windows to Mac OS X.
Since this "world" is new to me, I don't want to spend a lot of money buying a "good" mac computer.
So can you please tell me if buying an iMac or an eMac is sufficent for a developer? What about the minimum memory and disk requirements?
By the way, I read that I can download the MacOS X developer tools for free. Are they enough to port a C/C++ application?

Any tips or advices are welcome.

Thanks.

MacNewbie
Wednesday, February 19, 2003

"So can you please tell me if buying an iMac or an eMac is sufficent for a developer?"

Probably, though it depends on what kind of application.

"What about the minimum memory and disk requirements?"

The more the better but they are cheap. 256MB will let you run OSX for basic stuff. 40Gi HD I'd say at least and more if you are going to be doing any movie editing or such when you're not developing.

"By the way, I read that I can download the MacOS X developer tools for free."

This is true.

"Are they enough to port a C/C++ application?"

If you are relying on libraries developed in code warrior, no. But you can develop C/C++/ObjC with the included gnu compiler. The IDE for Cocoa is pretty nice too, you won't find such tools for free on any other platform.

Tony Chang
Wednesday, February 19, 2003

The application I am porting is a self-contained GUI C++ application that needs only a little memory to run. There are no database support, no movie, no rich graphics, etc...
The proting effort will be focused on rewriting the GUI part. Other modules shouldn't change much since they are written in standard C++.

Thanks

MacNewbie
Wednesday, February 19, 2003

Does the free Cocoa IDE include a debugger?

Frederik Slijkerman
Wednesday, February 19, 2003

It looks like you should be able to port it to the Macintosh with comparatively little effort.

The Cocoa IDE does come with a built-in GUI debugger (I'm staring at it right now).

Brent P. Newhall
Wednesday, February 19, 2003

FYI, I would avoid the eMac like the plague.  For whatever reason, those machines have been extremely problematic for Apple.  One vendor was quoted[1] as saying they've seen about a 60% failure rate, to which a friend of mine who works for Apple tech support said, "don't even get me started on the eMacs."  Since the iLamps come with G4s, that's probably the cheapest practical way to go.

[1] http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/02/03/BU197497.DTL

Sam Gray
Wednesday, February 19, 2003

That's sour grapes if I've ever seen some. The eMac is fine.

pb
Wednesday, February 19, 2003

The need for speed of the machine depends greatly on your project of course but an iMac seems to be OK.

The included IDE ProjectBuilder is OK. Kind of weird, but functional. It has a wrapper around gdb (the GNU debugger), which again works pretty well. (Anyone have cool tips for it?) No where near as good as Visual Studio, when the code is cross-platform I tend to use the Windows machine. (I'm using CVS to sync the two). And yes, you can put things together in a shell script (or makefile, and I'm sure there are better tools too) for a one-step build.

Here's a link from Apple which might be useful, though it's not about tools: http://developer.apple.com/macosx/win32porting/userinterface.html

mb
Wednesday, February 19, 2003

One thing you might want to take into consideration is that the eMac is quite noisy, whereas the iMac is silent.

Laurent
Thursday, February 20, 2003

6 dollars an hour.  I won't go any lower.

Cedric
Saturday, February 22, 2003

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