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interview related question

I have an interview scheduled with a company, is it a good idea to call up the company, and get some more information about the position from the person who e-mailed me the interview request?

anonymous
Sunday, February 16, 2003


I think you should go into an interview knowing as much about the company and the position as possible, and show as much interest and enthusiasm as you can muster during the interview.

I wouldn't necessarily phone the guy - if you have his e-mail, just drop him a note and ask for a written job description, or possibly a few specifics having to do with the product/division you're interviewing for.  Then you can do your own research on the net before the interview.

Jason
Sunday, February 16, 2003

"is it a good idea to call up the company, and get some more information about the position from the person who e-mailed me the interview request?"

Yeah, you should. Most companies would expect you to ask them.

The questions you should ask them in no particular order:
1.) Dress code for the interview
2.) No. of people who will interview you, time each interview will take
3.) Do you need to bring code samples
4.) the position you will be interviewing for
5.) Obiously, directions to the company:-)

Prakash S
Sunday, February 16, 2003

Prakash,
they already let me know most of the details,I want to know a little bit more about the position....

anon
Sunday, February 16, 2003

Well, if you have the interview set up anyway, why bother them beforehand? I think, the interview itself is the opportunity to find out everything you want to know about the job. An interview is not a one-way thing for the company to get to know you, but also for you to find out a lot about the company. Write down the questions you want to ask in advance and take your notes with you. That does not necessarily mean that you have to go through your list point for point, reading them of in the interview, but it allows you to drop in your questions whenever it is appropriate.

Have fun,

Jutta Jordans
Monday, February 17, 2003

If you can make contact with the person who actually wants the position filled then do it on whatever pretext you can.  If its 'just' a HR person then there's little point unless you have a make or break question.

The reason for needing to contact the principal is the same as in any other selling process, you have to get to the person that makes the decision and sell to them.  Selling to anyone else is only important insofar as they are gatekeepers to the principal.

Simon Lucy
Monday, February 17, 2003

I can make contact with the person in charge of hiring, should I contact him to get to know a bit more about the position? which would be preferable..phone or e-mail?

anonymous
Monday, February 17, 2003

Is that the person who is going to make the decision?

If so, then yes and by phone. 

Simon Lucy
Monday, February 17, 2003

I think so , he is the Chief exec. in the company.....

anonymous
Monday, February 17, 2003

Well that doesn't necessarily relate, he may be fiscally, organisationally responsible but is he who you would work for?  Is he the decision maker for this post?

Simon Lucy
Monday, February 17, 2003


Here's an idea:

Go check out the web-site.  Check out the product. 

Do some of your own, independent research. (preferably, talk to a couple of employees who AREN'T going to be interviewing you or involved in that process, to learn about the companies culture.)

And when they ask "Why do you want to work here?"

HAVE AN ANSWER FOR THEM.

Especially one that isn't "I want a job."

Instead, say "I want THIS job.  Here's why ..."

good luck!

Matt H.
Monday, February 17, 2003

<<to get to know a bit more about the position>>
anonymous, like Jutta said, the interview process is a two way street. If you are at interview stage, then I sure hope you already know something about the job in question :)

Having said that, it always impresses interviewers to know that you have done some homework about the company.

Look at the website. Do google searches on key staff/products. Learn enough about the company to ask the right questions during the interview.

You don't really want to talk to your potential interviewer(s) before the interview, because that already is an interview. (circular?). If I was hiring, and I got a questions from the person I was going to interview in x days, I would probably pull the interview.

1. It's the lazy way of trying to get info on the company.
2. Almost says that this person does not understand the purpose of an interview.
3. You ask me a silly question, and I drop you before we even meet.

I would stick with what Prakash listed (drop #4... should know that by now). Another risk of calling/emailing your interviewer is that you might expose your ignorance. Let them show their hand first during early stages of the interview, and then play it by ear.

tapiwa
Monday, February 17, 2003

[
And when they ask "Why do you want to work here?"

HAVE AN ANSWER FOR THEM.

Especially one that isn't "I want a job."
]

While interviewing for the best job I've ever had, the CEO asked "What is your professional goal?"
I said "write code for money"

He laughed his ass off then made me an offer.

Philo

Philip Janus
Monday, February 17, 2003

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