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Joel's Snoozers

Oh man, two snoozer articles in a row. Joel, please get back to writing about things you are an expert in. Not things you are just beginning to learn.

And about that Dell article. You said you thought Dell had a bad business model. But look who you bought your server from?

I-shouldn't-be-here-so-late-on-a-friday-because-I'm-in-a-bad-mood
Friday, February 14, 2003

Because they have a bad business model they must have a bad product? Is that what you're saying?

If a company is organized so as to lose money, that's too bad for them, and maybe for my warranty, if I care, but if they have a good product, I have no problem abusing their misorganization so that *I* can get a good deal.

What's so unusual?

Michael Swieton
Friday, February 14, 2003

Latest quarters results have Dell's profit up 32% as I recall, and prior Q's similarly impressive.  While many suffer, Dell thrives.  I don't think there is anything wrong with Dell's model - except that they should preload RedHat on their Laptops  :)

As for their use of JIT (just in time inventory), its a method man ylarge companies use to maintain flexibility and quality.  Quality, because delivery of parts is a significant part of delivering systems on time (one component of quality as both Dell and their customers see it).  By operating with minimal inventory, Dell forces suppliers to live up to order commitments - otherwise the supplier stands out like a sore thumb, and there is immediate negative feedback (Dell notices).

Anyhoo.  Happy Valentines day.  You smooth dog you.

Nat Ersoz
Friday, February 14, 2003

Although Dell notices, they sure don't do anything about it.  Long story short, a machine ordered a month ago has still not arrived.  As a matter of fact, when my relative went online (she was the one who ordered it), the status was showing as cancelled!  Ack!

Unfortunately, this seems to be the norm nowadays from Dell.  I've heard similar stories such as this.

Ron E.
Friday, February 14, 2003

One word. Outsourcing.


Friday, February 14, 2003

Regarding the initial topic, Joel has a full-time job, and his weblog subject matter is limited to whatever he comes across while running his company. It's reasonable that figuring out a good microphone setup is the most interesting thing that he has dealt with over the last few days.

Julian
Saturday, February 15, 2003

"Joel, please get back to writing about things you are an expert in. Not things you are just beginning to learn."

- I for one am interested in whatever happens in a start-up, if the "mic" is the most exciting thing, so be it.

"You said you thought Dell had a bad business model. But look who you bought your server from?"

- Don't know if you are the kind of guy who pays more money to buy stuff just because you don't like someone's business model!

Prakash S
Saturday, February 15, 2003

>And about that Dell article. You said you thought Dell had >a bad business model. But look who you bought your >server from?

The Dell article was written as a result of troubles with purchasing from Dell. If Joel didn't buy the Dell, he wouldn't have written the article

DUH

Damian
Saturday, February 15, 2003

"Joel, please get back to writing about things you are an expert in. Not things you are just beginning to learn."

Joel is still busy so I consider myself lucky he can even write these articles and post them up. 

I like how Joel is sharing his learning experiences.  It shows even smart people make mistakes and you can't be an expert in everything.  And Joel does not have an MBA but he still writes good strategy articles.  ( I also liked the tutorial despite the poor sound quality.  I viewed it as very acceptable since it showed how easy it is to use CityDesk.)

I also thought web servers were pretty much commodities.  So you can still buy it from a company with a bad business model.  Even if the company goes out of business next year which is unlikely, who cares.  It was cheap and reliable.  It would be easy to find someone with the right training and experience to fix it in case anything happens.  Then again, I am no expert so i really should not be saying anything. ;-)

Diego
Saturday, February 15, 2003

I agree that it's interesting reading about the process of starting and operating a small software company, microphones and all. 


This industry suffers from a lack of benevolent mentorship - most monetarily succesful geeks forget their roots and transform into condescending pr*cks out to exploit those that they once worked with.  I aspire to someday have a product and have a greater portion of my income come from products than from contract services - so it's great reading even the day to day events in the life of a business from someone who's not out to simply prove how great they are.


Now, if Joel posts about Ramen Noodles, I'm outta here... :-)

Bored Bystander
Saturday, February 15, 2003

Benevolent mentorship -- that's a nice way of putting it.

Even if I am not interested in some of Joel's articles, I find his willingness to share his insights to be truly rare.  There are lots of people out there, in computer programming and other professions, who learn things every day that could be of use to others in the field.

But they are "too busy" to share them with others.

Joel is not.  He's made sharing with others part of his job.  That's why this is a great web site.

programmer
Monday, February 17, 2003

Thank you, Bored Bystander.  That's going into my quotes file.

And yes, agreed.

Brent P. Newhall
Wednesday, February 19, 2003

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