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Java. Book Recommendations

Hi,

I am just starting out in java.

I am planning to use J2SE1.41 and I will be using swing.

The apps I am going to write will be desktop database apps linking to an SQL server e.g. MySql

Is there one book that encompasses all I need to know or can anyone recommend a book on swing, jdbc etc..

BTW I have used clipper, xbase++, foxpro and other 4gl programming languages but no Java

Mike Grace
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

Well, I like Java, but this is something I would not use it for. Maybe Delphi, or VB.

Stephan
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

This doesn't answer your specific requirement, but if I had to recommend just one java book to someone it would be "Thinking in Java" by Bruce Eckel.

You can download it for free from www.bruceeckel.com

Not a beginner's book, but a great resource for an experienced programmer.

Bruce Perry
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

Yeah I second that. TIJ is a great book. I am a bit of a sucker for O'Reilly's books. They really hammer down some of the topics really well but as references sometimes comes up short. I especially enjoy Java Network Programming, JDBC, Java Threads, Java I/O, Java NIO, and JDBC from these guys. Most people won't go this route (buying lots of books) unless they are sure they will be using Java for sure in the next few years though, so YMMV.

Li-fan Chen
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

I've not read it myself, but I've heard good things about Core Java.

It does give coverage of the subjects youre talking about.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0130927384/qid=1043165105/sr=8-3/ref=sr_8_3/102-0030574-4992162?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

Ged Byrne
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

I usually recommend the "Core Java 2" books by Horstmann and Cornell.

Just me (Sir to you)
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

A Programmer's Guide to Java Certification by Khalid Mughal is outstanding. It has just enough good-quality coverage to get you started, including Swing. Once you get through, prepare to buy more books :-)

Java book worm
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

>>Well, I like Java, but this is something I would not use it >>for. Maybe Delphi, or VB.


Stephan,

I did agree with this a few weeks ago, but I think Java is going to make great strides in this area with the next version (1.4.2) and "Tiger" (1.5) next year.

Also, I need cross platform.

Mike Grace
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

For Swing, I've found this very useful (you can read the chapters online; I bought two copies out of appreciation):
http://manning.spindoczine.com/sbe/
Basically it's a book that builds applications you can cut & paste from.  The intro chapters give a fast overview of Swing.

If you can get your company to spring for these books, I recommend:
http://java.sun.com/docs/books/chanlee/
They differ from the online Javadocs in that they have very useful small example programs, as well as many nicely formatted overviews.  Much of doing well in Java is just knowing the api.  Good for resolving disputes too.

anon
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

Thinking in Java by Bruce Eckel is pretty good. I've downloaded it here and put it on our intranet so whenever I need to check something quickly, I refer to it.

Also "Professional Java Programming" by Brett Spell is quite excellent as well.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/186100382X/qid=1043169996/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_1/002-9555270-1670423?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

S
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

Here's another thumbs-up for Swing by Robinson and Vorobiev.

I'm surprised no one has yet mentioned _Effective Java_ by Joshua Bloch.  Bloch wrote a lot of the java.math and java.util code, and it is -solid-.  EJ's one of the very best programming books I've ever read.

Paul Brinkley
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

My three favourites:

Practical Java by Haggar - An underrated little book, extremely readable.

Effective Java by Bloch - Widely regarded as a classic Java text.  Somewhat advanced.

Java Examples in a Nutshell by Flanagan - A wide range of source code to get you started.

The first two in particular explain the various idioms and rules that experienced Java programmers follow.

Enjoy,
Peter

Peter McKenzie
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

"Effective Java" is undoubtedly a classic but Mike said that he's just starting out using Java, so that's why it's probably not been mentioned as it's for the more experienced developer.

John Topley
Tuesday, January 21, 2003


I'd recommend "Java Cookbook" by Ian Darwin (O'Reilly).

The cookbook (short explainations of how to do specific tasks) is good for an experienced programmer who just needs to know language specific details in an area that they don't often work in.

I'll also recommend "Just Java" by Peter van der Linden (Prentice Hall). It's a huge book that covers almost everything and van der Linden is an entertaining writer.

Bill Tomlinson
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

This is great information guys.

Thanks a lot. I will check my bank balance and look into them.

Mike Grace
Wednesday, January 22, 2003

_Effective Java_ isn't -that- advanced.  Most importantly, it may inculcate some good habits in beginning programmers.  I suppose it may be hard to grasp completely when just starting.  (It certainly shouldn't be the book to read when learning Java syntax.)  But one should pick it up very shortly after learning the core Java packages, I think.

Paul Brinkley
Wednesday, January 22, 2003

I think Bloch's Effective Java can wait.  I just looked at excerpts from the 2nd chapter at Amazon, and think it takes a bit of familiarity with things like reflection, Java-style OOP, etc, which the original poster seems not to have.  These are simple concepts, but it would be nice to have coded a bit before the book becomes interesting.

anon
Wednesday, January 22, 2003

[[ I usually recommend the "Core Java 2" books by Horstmann and Cornell ]]

Me too, great book !
Contains chapters about basic and advanced Swing, lot's of examples with every line of code included in the book. Highly recommended, really

Evgeny Goldin
Wednesday, January 22, 2003

Effective Java is both great and advanced, but it is not for the beginner. Somebody already recommended Practical Java Programming Language Guide by Peter Haggar - it is a gem.

Java book worm
Wednesday, January 22, 2003

Also, use a Good IDE that can do the Swing stuff for you.  Unfortunately, I can't recommend one, as I've only done Web stuff in java.  Here's the current list:

Eclipse
NetBeans/Forte For Java
JBuilder
Intellij's IDEA

Eclipse is the best of the Free, but I don't know about it's Swing capabilities.  JBuilder is the 6000 lb gorilla

Adam Young
Wednesday, January 22, 2003

I would also look at the Windowing Toolkit that comes with Eclipse instead of Swing. Much better performance.

AEB
Thursday, January 23, 2003

My only concern with the Core Java Books is that they seem a bit old and don't cover 1.4.

Does this matter?

Mike Grace
Thursday, January 23, 2003

The first volume is now in its sixth edition, "Covers J2SE version 1.4"
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0130471771.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Just me (Sir to you)
Thursday, January 23, 2003

Thank you.

Mike Grace
Thursday, January 23, 2003

intelliJ is the best but no free...

Gary me2
Monday, May 17, 2004

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