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ADO.NET book recommendations?

Anybody have a favorite (preferably sub-300 pages) book on ADO.NET?  I know O'Reilly is coming out with a "Nutshell" book on the topic next month, but I need to get started Real Soon Now.

Sam Gray
Monday, January 20, 2003

Not a sub-300 page book, but the first chapter tells you what you need to know to get started with C# or VB.NET.

Professional ADO.NET Programming - Wrox Press

Dave B.
Monday, January 20, 2003

Really?  I picked up Professional XML from Wrox and found the multi-author format incredibly annoying -- each author had a different style, some had spent more time on their work than others.  IIRC, code samples were in the individual author's language of choice... in short, it was kind of a mess.  I'll check it out on the shelf, though.

Sam Gray
Monday, January 20, 2003

This one, by Mike Gunderloy, is pretty good.  I think the author visits this forum as well:

http://www.bookpool.com/.x/icsjny4a24/sm/0782129943

Regular Reader
Monday, January 20, 2003

Although the book has multiple authors, they stick with the C# language throughout the book.  At the time I bought it, it was the only one on the shelf at the B&N in my area.  Personnally, I've used it, the .NET help files, the Internet and various magazine articles to learn ADO.NET.  Having a background in ADO is recommended. 

Just my 2 cents.  There may be better books out there now, have'nt really looked into it.

Dave B.
Monday, January 20, 2003

I should say they stick with C# after chapter 1 or 2 because the first chapter or two gives examples of connecting to a database, creating a dataset, datareader etc.  They show these in VB.NET C# J# and Managed C++ I believe.

Dave B.
Monday, January 20, 2003

It is kind of surprising WROX is so successful with books having such problems with flows. Usually with other publishers I have little trouble moving on to the next chapter, but with WROX books it just seems more daunting. O'Reilly & Associates' works flow pretty well as does Addison Wesley and Prentice Hall. A lot of companies are learning from their mistakes too. I think computer books now days are much easier to read than even a few years ago.

Li-fan Chen
Monday, January 20, 2003

For a good "How the heck do I use this thing" discussion, I like Shawn Wildermuth's Pragmatic ADO.NET

http://btobsearch.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?userid=0FJMV5RAUI&btob=Y&isbn=0201745682&itm=4

For more detailed background, try Bob Beachamin's Essential ADO.NET:

http://btobsearch.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?userid=0FJMV5RAUI&btob=Y&isbn=0201758660&itm=7

-Chris

Disclaimer: I was a reviewer on the first book, and a friend of both authors.

Chris Tavares
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

| IIRC, code samples were in the
| individual author's language of choice

This could be a problem when dealing with something
else than .NET. But as .NET is really language neutral and
ADO.NET is a framework that is equally accessed from
all languages that can access it, the language with which
it is accessed should not be so much of a problem

m2c

René Nyffenegger
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

René:  Not so much, no, although I still have issues looking at VB.NET code when I'm more familiar with C#.  That was more of an issue with the XML book.

BTW, I picked up this book last night:  http://www.manning.com/feldman/

The author's writing style is comfortable and so far, the reading goes pretty quickly.

Sam Gray
Tuesday, January 21, 2003

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