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logic tests

I went for a test today at a Company for a programmer position.HR interviewed me, then I was given a  test,some logic and some coding.Some of the questions seem vague to me, but since no person was present at the test,all that they will have is my written work.I did suck at the test,and it's going to be marked by the team lead,do you think it's a fair way to conduct these tests on pen and paper without anybody present?

sr
Thursday, December 12, 2002

I don't know if "fair" is the point in question. Maybe it is just a stupid way, because when someone messes up in the test, they have no way to notice that this might be due to ambiguity in the test questions.

Personally I really love logic tests and puzzles, but it drives me mad if they are not precise. (Even if it is just a puzzle in a magazine or something, so it does not even have any impact on my career). So I really understand your frustration. But if this is the companies policy, maybe it is not too bad that you flunked, because that could mean that it is not a good place to work anyway.

On the other hand, maybe they know about the problems that can arise when working with the questions. Maybe they want to see your reactions and strategies when your are left alone with a problem. But in that case, they would have asked you about how you got along with them etc., making the interview after the test more important then the test itself and I think you would have noticed that.

Have you had the chance to talk to someone about your problems after taking the logic test?

Have fun,

Jutta Jordans
Thursday, December 12, 2002

I could be wrong, but in the USA, isn't it illegal to give an unsupervised general test during a job interview?

PTBarnum
Thursday, December 12, 2002

The test may be deliberately vague, to provoke reactions.  The test writers may have been thinking, "Let's see if the candidate takes the trouble to note issues and difficulties with the problem themselves...that's the sort of employee we really want."

In which case, they're essentially trying to trick you, which is rather inhumane.

As Jutta pointed out, "fair" may not be the point in question.  The company can set up whatever questions it wants to.  You still don't have to take the job.  And, in fact, the test seems to be pushing you away from taking the job.

Regarding PTBarnum's post, I don't think that this sort of test is illegal in the USA.  Why would it be?

Brent P. Newhall
Thursday, December 12, 2002

Let me rephrase my last paragraph:  I don't know if this sort of test is illegal in the USA.

Brent P. Newhall
Thursday, December 12, 2002

Giving an "IQ Test" in job interviews is illegal in the states, due to discrimination laws. For instance, making your janitor candidate take that logic test would be extremely illegal. I believe it is legal when hiring a programmer, because it can be construed as domain specific.

PTBarnum
Thursday, December 12, 2002

Actually One of the questions was taken from the techinterview.org site, and I managed to goof that off as well.Anyway I really got nervous and bombed it.But the company only conducts interviews after the test,depending how well you did on it.

sr
Thursday, December 12, 2002

I also have to take a logic test.  Is there any way to prepare for such a test?

Murray Kain
Friday, November 21, 2003

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