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C# & .net book recommendations

Does anyone have any recommendations in this area? I'm looking for something that doesn't have hundreds of pages of fluff and doesn't require me to take out a mortgage. Ideally something like K&R as regards covering the C# language itself, but with decent coverage of areas such as multhithreading, remoting, and network programming.

Andrew Simmons
Tuesday, August 27, 2002

I found http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/dotnetfrmess2/ to be a good general introduction to .NET .  For C#, I had the first edition of http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/progcsharp2/ . This did the job, but not in a way that would make me wholehartedly recommend it.  If you need to do a GUI, get http://www.microsoft.com/mspress/books/5188.asp .

Just me (Sir to you)
Tuesday, August 27, 2002

This was a good introduction to C# and the CLR (you need to understand both)

Professional C# by Simon Robinson, Jay Glynn, and a bunch of others.  Wrox Press.

IanRae
Tuesday, August 27, 2002

I liked Eric Gunnerson's "A Programmer's Introduction to C#", Apress Publishing. He is part of the C# team and can usually be found on www.devhood.com forums, www.gotdotnet.com forums, and ms .net newgroups such as microsoft.public.dotnet.languages.csharp. He has answered me directly and stays touch with developers. The book was clearly written, concise, and inexpensive.

Ian Stallings
Tuesday, August 27, 2002

Get Troelsen's book, C# and the .NET Platform.  Its an excellent book. One of the best.

Up until I read that book, I could'nt figure out how to pass variables between forms. It did'nt hit me that I could just wrap my private form variables in public properties and expose them. Simple but highly effective.

You should also get programming Windows 2000 with C#.

Pierre
Tuesday, August 27, 2002

I personally think that the dotNet SDK is a perfect starting point for programmers wanting to know about C#.  I did buy an Oriely book, but I ended up using the SDK way more then the book.  It has sample programs to play around with, a "getting started" section to teach you the basics, a whole section on "how to" with common tasks such as building web forms, windows, database interaction, etc.  After that, I just started using the class library.  (which has a decent ammount of sample code).

Vincent Marquez
Tuesday, August 27, 2002

Thanks for the replies. I like Vincent's suggestion the best, given that computer book prices in New Zealand seem to have gone through the roof of late.

Andrew Simmons
Tuesday, August 27, 2002

You can also download a free copy of "Thinking in C#" from www.bruceeckel.com.

Hakan
Tuesday, September 03, 2002

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