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Added-value of ASP.Net vs. other tools?

I'm currently doing my homework to decide whether the technology is good enough now to rewrite a Visual Basic application as a web-based application.
I know PHP, OpenCMS, Zope, and am currently checking out ASP.Net.

I don't know enough yet about either developing web applications or the .Net framework to be able to tell what it offers that I can't find in those other products (either just a language like PHP, or a beefed-up environment like Zope).

So... could a kind soul tell me why I should choose to develop with .Net (in VB.Net) rather than using those other tools?

Any info much appreciated
EvH

PS: And if someone knows of an equivalent of the excellent VSFlexGrid object that my dad uses in his applications, it would be most wonderful. I'm not holding my breath, though :-)

Edward van Halen
Thursday, August 08, 2002

Why don't you deploy it using Microsoft Thin client technology. Why re-write?

Place your application on windows terminal server, and you are done. What is all the fuss about?

You can web enable your whole package, and not re-write one line of code?

At the end of the day, you re-write something if you need to use some new technology that the application did not have before.

Unless there is some specific .net technology you plan to use, then I see little reason to re-write the application.

Do you?

Albert D. Kallal
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
Kallal@msn.com

Albert D. Kallal
Thursday, August 08, 2002

"Why don't you deploy it using Microsoft Thin client technology. Why re-write?"

Because you have to pay a small fortune for client and server licenses to deploy apps with terminal server?

Because terminal server doesn't go through firewalls that well? Actually, that may not be true now, but it used to be a big problem.

Because sometimes it's worth the rewrite just to learn the new technology? New tech gives you a chance to look at new design ideas.

Chris Tavares
Thursday, August 08, 2002

Actually, I never had TS not work through a firewall.

However, my comments were a bit snide. I think there is a lot more reasons to avoid TS then just ones of cost!

I was being a bit provocative here, and in reading my original comments, they don’t read that well.

My comments here in this thread did not really contribute much...I try and work on this!


Albert D. Kallal
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
Kallal@msn.com

Albert D. Kallal
Friday, August 09, 2002

While you're evaluating web application servers, be sure to check out WebObjects http://www.webobjects.com/ -- it's the granddaddy of web application servers, and still has features not available anywhere else.  This is especially true with its object-relational mapping framework (the Enterprise Objects Framework) and its rule-based system for generating rich web applications on the fly directly from your schema (Direct to Web).  There's even an extension to Direct to Web that can generate Java *applications* on the fly that use XML over HTTP to communicate with a WebObjects server and present a richer interface than you can in a browser.

There are some tutorials and overviews on the site.  There's also a few books out there; "Professional WebObjects 5.0 with Java" is *mildly* dated (WebObjects 5.1 is the current release) but it'll give you a good overview of almost all WebObjects' features including Direct to Web and Direct to Java Client.

Oh, and WebObjects 5 and later are 100% Java.  They can generally be deployed anywhere there's a Java 2 1.3.1 runtime.  The major new feature in WebObjects 5.1 is J2EE integration; you can deploy a WebObjects application as a J2EE servlet, and you can even integrate WebObjects with JSP.  (But you probably wouldn't want to, since WebObjects is so much more powerful.)

Chris Hanson
Friday, August 09, 2002

Thanks everyone for your comments. Being a VB addict, my dad won't consider Java or any other languages, but I'll look into the MS Thin Client technology.

Thx
EvH

Edward van Halen
Sunday, August 11, 2002

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