Fog Creek Software
Discussion Board




Why the name CityDesk?

Someone wrote:
> BTW: Why is the software called CityDesk? I would never
> have guessed that it had anything to do with content
> management. Is there a funny story you'd like to
> share :)?

Do a google search for "City Desk" or "City Desk editor".  It's a newspaper term for the news desk.  Hence, publishing... get it?

Software names don't *really* have to give you any impression of what they *really* do... (Take Cold Fusion or Vignette for example).. but hopefully CityDesk gives you some idea that its connected to publishing.

We wanted to make a *desktop* content management system that a church group or a school newspaper could use.  We didn't want the user to have to understand what XML or RSS is all about.  We just wanted them to be able to write and click the big PUBLISH button and be done with it.  Hopefully CityDesk will fulfill that role.

Michael Pryor
Sunday, October 14, 2001

Will CityDesk require software on the server, or simply software on the client that will generate HTML for upload?  I ask because my wife would like to maintain our personal web site and the host does not permit anything more than "plane-jane" html.  (She does not know HTML).

Thanks,

Greg

Greg Meyer
Monday, October 15, 2001

Greg, your wife's website is exactly the kind of thing CityDesk was designed for. You run it on Windows. All the content management is done on Windows. Then it uploads any HTML files that have changed (using FTP or file copy) to a generic web server which doesn't know anything about CityDesk.

Joel Spolsky
Monday, October 15, 2001

It doesn't, by any chance, produce (and subsequently upload) actual, valid HTML, does it?  Because there seems to be some sort of unwritten law that "all desktop applications that generate HTML must ensure that it does not validate."

John Siracusa
Monday, October 15, 2001

As long as your templates are valid, we'll upload valid HTML. (as far as i know. there are always bugs that i don't know about!)

But we don't have a validator per se... that would be a great idea.

Joel Spolsky
Monday, October 15, 2001


Sure it might be valid HTML.  But will it _validate_?

As in validator.w3.org....

Anon Lover
Tuesday, October 16, 2001

..and as in "not like this page", heh ;-)

John Siracusa
Wednesday, October 17, 2001

I think the point is that you make the templates yourself, so if you make a valid (as in will validate) template, it will validate. It's like asking a pen company if the pen will spell correctly, it's not up to them.

matt
Thursday, October 18, 2001

matt wrote:
> I think the point is that you make the templates yourself,
> so if you make a valid (as in will validate) template, it will
> validate.

And I thought the point was

: to make a *desktop* content management system that a
: church group or a school newspaper could use. We didn't
: want the user to have to understand what XML or RSS is
: all about. We just wanted them to be able to write and
: click the big PUBLISH button and be done with it.

That sounds as if they require fairly minimal knowledge of HTML and pre-configured templates or wizards or whatever that people can use to get productive quickly. Since those who know HTML can just use something like HomeSite if all they want is a syntax highlighting editor.

> It's like asking a pen company if the pen will spell
> correctly, it's not up to them.

I think it's more like a fill-out form where you would like to have the pre-printed stuff spelled correctly.

For example, if I buy a blank receipt book in a stationery shop, I expect things such as "receipt" or "amount" to be spelled correctly. I don't expect them to auto-spellcheck what *I* write in, but I expect what's there to be correct.

(And I also liked John Siracusa's comment:

> ..and as in "not like this page", heh ;-)

.)

Anonymous Coward
Thursday, October 18, 2001

*  Recent Topics

*  Fog Creek Home