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S-Q-L or SeQueL?

I know I'm a nit-picking, pedantic S.O.B., but is the proper term not "S-Q-L" (three separate, individual letters)?

It makes me cringe when I hear it called "Sequel", but the term seems to have become so pervasive that I hesitate to correct people.

Please, sound off and let your vote be counted.

a) S-Q-L.
b) Sequel.
c) Shut up, you nit-picking, pedantic S.O.B.
d) None of the above.

The Word
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

b

Just me (Sir to you)
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

b

except in the case of MySQL where they specifically tell you to spell it out :)

jedidjab79
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

b

Grumpy Old-Timer
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

In my home country, we used to pronounce three separate letters: S-Q-L. However, here in US I hear people saying something like 'Sequel'.

I heard that it is proper pronuncation because original IBM project was called 'Sequel', which is later shortened to SQL and then somebody interpreted those letters as 'Structured Query Language'... But this can be old-wives' tales as well...

Djido
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

A

marcus
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

It's S-Q-L.

The original IBM project was called Sequel (for Structured English QUEry Language) at first - then they dropped the English and renamed it SQL.  I think the use of "Sequel" actually got officially deprecated at the first standardisation conference....

JP
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

S-Q-L, thank you very much.

I don't like when, for each abbreviation, I have to remember a separate way to pronounce it!

Gigi Duru - cel mai tare din parcare!
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

It's whatever people want to call it, and it's folly to 'correct' people for personal nuances like that, especially when probably 95% of people call it "sequel". Arguing against it sounds like Slashdot and its continual campaign to reform the word "hacker".

Microsoft has a globally unique identifier -- Do you calling it a G-U-I-D? If you're like most people you call it a Goo-id. Other people, albeit a smaller percentage, pronounce it as Gwid, but the idea is the same.

Dennis Forbes
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

It's Del-fee, not Del-thigh. Sorry, reminds me of an endless debate that was always raging on one of Borland's Delphi newsgroups!

Who gives a sh*t, as long as people know what you're referring to?

John Topley (www.johntopley.com)
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

I pronounce it as S-Q-L, but I know some people pronounce it as sequel. (which I don't particularily like).

Indeed in MySQL, they specifically instructed to pronounce it as My-S-Q-L. In Nosql, on the other hand, the author requested it pronounced as "No-sequel".

Shlomi Fish
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Sequel is faster to say, i don't have a moment to waste!

-
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

S-Q-L all the way...

DJ
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

S-Q-L

Language matters. The big failing of every company I've worked at is communications. Why do we have to learn a new set of jargon with every new company? Why does every new generation of programmers have to create their own set of jargon?

It was S-Q-L for years. Why does it have to change? If you cannot give me a good reason then don't change it.

anon2
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

As another poster mentioned, a predecessor (though not ancestor) to SQL was an IBM project called Structured English Query Language, otherwise called sequel. Later they ratified SQL, and _at_the_time_ they had a great need to differentiate them, hence a big pedantry about the pronounciation. However in the year 2003, is there really a lot of confusion about whether you're talking about SEQL or SQL if you say Sequel? I find the link between the current pronounciation and the original IBM project to be tenuous regardless - How ELSE does one "wordicize" the acronym SQL? Sqwill? Acronyms virtually always get sounded out (is it N-A-T-O, or NATO? N-O-R-A-D or Norad? People prefer to say words), and sequel seems like an obvious pronounciation of SQL.

Having said that, 99% of the acrimony that you see relating to the pronounciation Sequel has to do with the fact that Microsoft marketed SQL Server with the Sequel pronounciation. Instantly the UNIX/Anti-MS crowd was polarized, and they knew what nit picking would allow them to set themselves apart from the lowly MS masses.

Dennis Forbes
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

S-Q-L. If an initialism doesn't have any vowels, it's not really an acronym, and therefore doesn't get pronounced as a word. (Unless you're Welsh, maybe.)

Martha
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

a) S-Q-L

"Who gives a sh*t, as long as people know what you're referring to?"

You'd be surprised how many people think that "SQL" and "MS SQL Server" are synonymous. I've used "S-Q-L" after being misinterpreted several times.

Nick
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Not all acronimes get "wordized".  How about ATM??

I think it is preferrable to pronouce them as words _when_ there are logical vowel sounds to go by.  It seemed to me (without knowing the SEQL history) that "sequel" was just a cute marketing name and once I heared all the CEOs pronouncing it that way it made my cringe...

DJ
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

I pronounce it "sequel" (it's easier), but if someone around me says S-Q-L, my brain is sophisticated enough to handle the concept that a word can be pronounced either one of two ways.

Alyosha`
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Sequel

Anyone who says S-Q-L Server is silly...

Yes the E for English was dropped but it is still pronounced Sequel!!!!!!!

GenX'er
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

c

Philo
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

And the fact that this thread quickly gathered 20 responses pretty much sums up what most people think of programmers:

Argumentative, stubborn dolts who fuss over the stupidiest, stupidiest things.

Ashamed
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

I store Gwids in the Sequel Server.

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Line-x, or Lyn-ux? :-)

Geo
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Exactly Nick!  I do the exact same thing to let my PHB know whether I am talking about S-Q-L code or the Sequel server.

shiggins
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

I'm trying to figure out a situation where either it wasn't painfully obvious whether you were talking about a language or a server, or it just didn't matter.

Philo

Philo
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

I write software for a manufacturing company.  I am the only computer literate person within 10 miles.  I was debugging some code once and the PHB asked what I was doing.  I tried to explain the code and he asked if we neede to call IBM.  We have an IBM server.

Welcome to the hell that is my life :)

shiggins
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

the above shoud say "if we needed".  Oops.

shiggins
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

the above should say "the above should say".  I'm going home, we'll try again tomorrow.

shiggins
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Yes, I know the officially sanctioned pronunciation is S-Q-L. That said, I almost always say "SeQueL" because it's fewer syllables and in most contexts there's no ambiguity. I won't deride anyone who prefers the precise approach and extra syllable, I just opt for brevity myself.

For anyone who wants to castigate my laziness, I wonder: When was the last time you referred to an "ess-cee-ess-eye" interface or hard drive? Doesn't *everyone* say "scuzzy"?

John C.
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

How about UNIX -- I hope you all say U-N-I-X lest we think that you're talking about the participants at a GPL convention. (Cue rimshot after needless troll flame of GPL advocates).

Dennis Forbes
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

A) S-Q-L

Sequel sounds dumb and, in my experience, often is used to mean SQL Server. I don't like product specific adaptations of general terms.

Yanwoo
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

>>How ELSE does one "wordicize" the acronym SQL? Sqwill?

A DBA friend of mine used to call it "Squeeeeel Server" (insert whiny pig noise here), a not-too-subtle reference to the performance of SQL Server 6.x when asked to do anything important.

Jeff MacDonald
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

b)

only a) when referring to SQL Server.

pb
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Either

Li-fan Chen
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

you guys are serious dorks.

.
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

We actually call it SQueaL Swerver <grin>

It's not "Sequel". IBM, way back in the age of dinosaurs had a language called QUEL. They then later revised it and called it (you guessed it) SEQUEL. I don't know this from experience (too young) but I've heard it from a few "old-timers" who used to cringe whenever I referred to our database as "Sequel". Anyway, we all call them our SQueaL Swervers now, so there's no confusion.

Sgt. Sausage
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

I seem to remember some Oracle docs from way back (10+ years ago) that had "SQL (pronounced sequel)" in it.

dude
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Also:

Anyone who places their toilet paper in the incorrect "underhand" position (rather than the obviously superior "overhand" position) must be unfamiliar with the important historical precedent for correct toilet paper configuration.

Benji Smith
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

a

In fact, I had to look up "Sequel Server" when my sister wasked me what it was.

Andrew Burton
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

b) Sequel.
c) Shut up, you nit-picking, pedantic S.O.B.

Newbies always call it S-Q-L


Tuesday, August 05, 2003

S-Q-L
Microsoft crowd calls it sequel

Phil McKraken
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

I tend to say Sequel Server for the product and SQL for the language but then that's me.

I fought and won a battle to change a product name from Sequel to something else,( it turned out to be Opera, no not the browser), for two reasons, one of which was that I didn't want any questions about whether the database code used SQL or not, as it didn't but I wanted it to in the future and I didn't want any smart aleck bad marketing to bite me.

Simon Lucy
Tuesday, August 05, 2003

Either is fine, but I'm lazy (go figure) and usually say "sequal" since it's slides off the tongue easier  ;)

HumanCompiler (Erik Porter)
Wednesday, August 06, 2003

A. Its not a word, its an acronym.


Wednesday, August 06, 2003

Or even, "it's not a word, it's an acronym".

Hey, I'm allowed, it's that kind of thread! ;-)

John Topley (www.johntopley.com)
Wednesday, August 06, 2003

sql
it takes too long to write it the other way

aku beg
Wednesday, August 06, 2003

Yeah, I know, I always forget what the rules for apostrophes with "it" are, so I just omit the apostrophes completely in such cases.

And no, you're not allowed because "it is that kind of thread". If you were, then I would have something to say about Erik Porter's "slides off the tongue" comment and cunning linguists correcting apostrophe mistakes, but you aren't, it isn't, and therefore I won't. Okay? :-)


Wednesday, August 06, 2003

We always called it SQuirreL

David Clayworth
Wednesday, August 06, 2003

A) S-Q-L

SEQUEL is a type of software you can use to run S-Q-L language.

(distributed and administered by Advanced Systems Concepts. http://www.asc-iseries.com)

Kevin G. Bayless
Monday, January 19, 2004

a.  pronounce it S-Q-L

IBM already used SEQUEL... just another case of Microsoft trying to latch onto a previously used term to take over the "sense of familiarity" associated with it.  There are no vowels in the abbreviation "SQL".

Enough with the cutesie marketing malarkey that bastardizes the English language.  Some abbreviations are better left as abbreviations rather than acronyms.

charles hill
Tuesday, January 20, 2004

If anyone cares I believe that in general acronyms are pronounced as individual letters when there are three or fewer letters and as words for four or more letters. Of course there are exceptions.

Kris Mahc
Tuesday, February 03, 2004

With regards to MySQL, I always tend to pronounce it my sequel -- it's much easier, takes much less time, and there really is no need to differentiate between different SQL-compatible servers -- just like you don't call Microsoft's C++ "c plus plus" and Borland's C++ Builder "c add add". As far as the user's concerned, both are interfaces using the same base language, and pronounciation doesn't really matter. After all, it could be pronounced another way in another country.

Sequel to SQL
Saturday, February 21, 2004

A Mr. P Kirk thinks its pronounced SQL therefore the correct pronunciation must be Sequel.

Not P Kirk
Thursday, March 18, 2004

Mr not P Kirk, I know who you are, so stop surfing the Interweb and get back to work. A S A P (or should that be asap, one word???)

p.s. It's Sequel

Mr not P Kirks Boss
Thursday, March 18, 2004

My 4 ha'pennies: I say "sequel" just because the 10 milliseconds and 0.2 calories I save add up to a lot over the course of the day. I then inevitably end up wasting the savings reading through (and participating in) drivel like this. FWIW, I've never had to explain what "sequel" was because someone in the conversation always calls it "S-Q-L". However, I do agree that "SQuerL" would be an equally lazy-ass, though accurate pronunciation, no? -- I'd use it. Hmm, though some Asians wouldn't be able to pronounce it (you know, "Fried rice, you plick!"). That's it for me, thank-you-good-night!

Sushi
Saturday, March 27, 2004

For the record, if it's not pronouceable (e.g., ATM), it's an abbreviation.  If it can be pronounced (e.g., NATO), it's an acronym.

.
Saturday, April 10, 2004

S-Q-L. It's not SeQuel. It sucks to hear someone say Sequel. Hmmm....I could also agree with SQuerL. SeQuel just bothers me.

SeQuel Hater
Friday, April 16, 2004

its sql.... there is a language called sequel, those of you who pretend its sequel are refering to a language you don't know how to program in.

Ridry
Friday, May 07, 2004

you sad bastards!!!!

EV
Wednesday, June 02, 2004


"
For the record, if it's not pronouceable (e.g., ATM), it's an abbreviation.  If it can be pronounced (e.g., NATO), it's an acronym
"

could ATM not be pronounced "AToM"

S-Q-L all the way

_
Saturday, June 19, 2004

SQL is truest - SQueaL would be OK, but SeQueL is plain wrong...
-Why does the 'S' become See?  No reason...
-at least SQueaL is only one syllable, and is more true of what the acronym is - by way of not adding sounds that don't exist
-whoever called it sequel is uneducation
-laziness is not an excuse, or you would say squeal

wattro
Tuesday, June 29, 2004

i am uneducation...

wattro
Tuesday, June 29, 2004

egads...I'm suffering from TMA (Too Many Acronyms - and I don't think *that* can be pronounced either)

Ken
Tuesday, June 29, 2004

I believe the term sequel originated from an Asian programmer who found it too difficult to say S-Q-L.  I was amazed to see this slang/swear word infect everything globally.

Marc D.
Tuesday, July 06, 2004

I can't believe this thread has gone on for a year!!

I was looking up SQL vs Sequel as I am not a programmer or DBA but work with them and didn't want to look an idiot. It's hard to write technical manuals when no-one can agree on the terminology!

You guys haven't helped!!

;-)

ladymuck
Thursday, August 12, 2004

It's S-Q-L; 'nuff said.

I_hate_Microsoft.
Tuesday, August 17, 2004

SQL !!!!!!!

aa
Thursday, August 26, 2004

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