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Transferring XP home license

I have a new computer. I'm trying to activate XP on the new computer and get an activation error.

When I call MS support they say I have to buy a new copy of XP even if I uninstall XP on the old one (which has a fried motherboard so I'm not using XP on that anyway...).

This seems like a joke. Is there anything I can do?

PLEASE NO LINUX/OPEN SOURCE FLAMES!

Microsoft isn't bad for the consumer?
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

wtf?  are you serious?  can anybody verify this?


Tuesday, March 30, 2004

Whenever I deal with them I simply tell them that:

a) I've uninstalled it off my old machine
  -and-
b) I'm installing it on my new machine

They have _always_ been more than gratious in giving me a new activaction code over the phone to get it working.  The trick is telling them what they want to hear.  Who cares if it's not at all the case.  Note of caution:  If you're doing this every other week, it won't work any longer.  Then you're kind of up shit creek, but if you're a typical user and have a legitamite use for a new install, I've never had a problem.

Elephant
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

I will try to call again and post the results here.

Microsoft isn't bad for the consumer?
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

<<
When I call MS support they say I have to buy a new copy of XP even if I uninstall XP on the old one (which has a fried motherboard so I'm not using XP on that anyway...).
>>

So you bought a PC with an OEM copy of XP home and you want to transfer it to another PC?  No can do.

<<
This seems like a joke. Is there anything I can do?
>>
Go buy a retail copy of XP - install it to any one PC you'd like.  Feel free to transfer it to another PC.

...
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

OEM copies of Windows are cheap (~$50-100 depending on who you are (Dell, or joe-schmoe PC shop.)

Retail version will run you about $200 or so (haven't checked in a while) - but it won't tie you to a specific PC/hardware.

Trade-offs...

...
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

"So you bought a PC with an OEM copy of XP home and you want to transfer it to another PC?  No can do."

Maybe I'm missing something here, but what made you reach that conclusion?

I'm not saying you're wrong, just that I found nothing in the OP that supports your statement.

Paulo Caetano
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

There is nothing in the license agreement that prohibits moving your copy of XP to another machine if you have a retail license.

OEM, on the other hand, which is quite prevalent and just about the only thing you'll get when purchasing a machine from a big vender, is bound to the hardware in life and beyond.  It cannot be transferred.

Since the support people are telling the original poster that he can't transfer, it is logical to assume the copy is OEM.

Spock bein' all logical
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

For the uninitiated & lazy...

Retail License:
http://www.attivissimo.net/rimborso_windows/eula_windows_xp_home_usa.txt

Excerpt:
4. TRANSFER-Internal.  You may move the Product to a different Workstation Computer.

OEM License:
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~ycchen/courses/legal_ethic_infas/Readings_ex/software_liability/microsofteula.pdf

Excerpt:
Software as a Component of the Computer - Transfer. THIS LICENSE MAY NOT BE SHARED, TRANSFERRED TO OR USED CONCURRENTLY ON DIFFERENT COMPUTERS. The SOFTWARE is licensed with the COMPUTER as a single integrated product and may only be used with the COMPUTER.

...
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

What if I bought one of those OEM copies off EBay that comes with a screw? 


Tuesday, March 30, 2004

>>What if I bought one of those OEM copies off EBay that comes with a screw? 

Those aren't locked to specific hardware. The 'manufacturer' doesn't get as much discount as the OEM's that lock it to specific hardware, but there is still a good discount.

RocketJeff
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

OEM copies have to come with a new computer, I think MS define this as somewhat generously as a new HD or MB being installed, but I may be wrong about this.
OEM licenses are a pain, however the discount is substantial.

Peter Ibbotson
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

A lot depends what country the OP lives in. There is a German court decision that specifically gives the right to transfer OEM licenses. I suspect there are other countries as well.

I'd practise your German accent; even iif you don't get activation it's good practiise for getting elected governor of California.

Stephen Jones
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

I'd argue "what is the definition of 'computer'".  Suppose the mother board is burned out, and you replace that.  Is that now a new computer or the same computer?  You upgrade the RAM and/or replace the hard drive.  New or old computer.  You replace the monitor, new or old?  You replace the CPU, new or old?

"Computer", as defined by common usage, has very little to do with the CPU and storage devices.  Technically, the CPU and storage defines the "computer" (cannot have a computing machine without them), however I think Microsoft would have a hard time arguing that just because you replaced the motherboard, you now have to purchase a new license.

I say small claims court would be an interesting experiment.

skinhead
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

If all else fails

http://www.emule-project.net/

Fred
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

Out of order!

Moderator, please delete the last post.

PO'ed software developer
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

Piracy is a simple option in this case.

If you feel that Microsoft is taking the piss, rather than spend too much effort trying to go down the "correct path", take immediate action that you think is fair.

Pirate (or non-activation copies) of XP are easy enough to come by, so I've heard. I doubt Microsoft are ever going to find out or ever bother to chase you as an individual.

I'm not advocating piracy, I wouldn't advocate breaking the law. However, you have to sometimes look at the law and the regulations and decide if they're appropriate or not. And if you find not then you have to exact your own justice.

"The law is an ass". It's a fact. It's expected to be tested. Unfortunately this is far too much trouble for most of us so rough justice is the satisfactory answer.

gwyn
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

<off-topic>
"Piracy is a simple option in this case."

Piracy is usually a simple option. It's getting simpler by the day, when compared to the "DRM mess". That's the real problem.
</off-topic>

OK, let's get back to the subject at hand, shall we?

Paulo Caetano
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

I called back and was able to get reactivated. As far as I know my copy is not OEM.

This activation stuff is dumb. How many people give up after their first call with tech support and just buy a new copy of XP? Microsoft should be more helpful.

I was not aware of the OEM issue before. I think that it's also bad for the consumer.

Microsoft isn't bad for the consumer?
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

What did you say that led to a different outcome?


Tuesday, March 30, 2004

Disclaimer: IANAL.

You didn't sign a contract with Microsoft; the OEM did.  They are the ones who agreed to sell the software only with a new computer.  Since you didn't sign a contract with them, the only rights Microsoft has to restrict you are given by copyright law, and copyright law does not allow them to prevent you from installing a copy on another machine, as long as the installation is removed from the previous machine.

However, in this case Microsoft actually holds the key to the functioning of the software, and in the absence of a court ruling forcing them to reactivate it for another computer, if they don't want to cooperate you're screwed.

Even if you don't move it to another machine, or your copy is the retail version, what if they refuse to reactivate it some 5 years from now when XP support is no longer available?  You'll buy the next version?

Conclusion: Don't buy software products that come with technologically enforceable restrictions,  unless you can crack the restrictions and are willing to take the risk of violating the DMCA. Ergo, Windows 2000 will be my last Windows OS unless it becomes absolutely necessary to buy XP or a later version to do my job.  Hopefully by the time .NET becomes ubiquitous, a useful implementation will also be available for Linux.

T. Norman
Wednesday, March 31, 2004

Please take your /. b.s. elsewhere please.  Activation Done Right(tm) works.  Yes it's inconvenient for some, but so is having to register your car every X years in your state of residence.  You want the privilege to drive, deal with the hassle.

It's better than the alternative (for now - linux/oss blows on the desktop on user-friendliness.)  When linux reaches Microsoft ease of use, blah blah, Microsoft will either no longer be developing a desktop OS, or they'll be giving it away and require no activation, or it will sit on a ROM chip in your XBOX 12, where again, no activation will be required.

...
Wednesday, March 31, 2004

"Activation Done Right(tm) works."

Well, you might want to present us with some examples of this. I, for one, have never had the honor of meeting such a beastie :)


"You want the privilege to drive, deal with the hassle."

I believe the problems arise when I *want* to deal with the hassle, but I can't, because:
a) the vendor has decided that I really shouldn't be using that old-fashioned version anymore, since there even isn't support available for it, and insists that I must upgrade to a newer version - ergo, no more activation key for you.
b) the vendor has decided that there's more money to be had in the cannabis industry, and doesn't develop software anymore - ergo, no more activation key for you.
c) the vendor has decided that <insert whatever scenario you consider plausible, in which you get no say on the matter, and had better put up or shut up> - ergo, no more activation key for you.

Can you detect a pattern here? :)

Paulo Caetano
Wednesday, March 31, 2004

http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/basics/activation/mpafaq.asp

Will Microsoft use activation to force me to upgrade? In other words, will Microsoft ever stop giving out activation codes for any of the products that require activation?

No, Microsoft will not use activation as a tool to force people to upgrade. Activation is merely an anti-piracy tool, nothing else.

Microsoft will also support the activation of Windows XP throughout its life and will likely provide an update that turns activation off at the end of the product's lifecycle so users would no longer be required to activate the product.

...
Wednesday, March 31, 2004

"No, Microsoft will not use activation as a tool to force people to upgrade. Activation is merely an anti-piracy tool, nothing else."

Life must be a lot simpler when you are so trusting of others.

I mean it. No sarcasm intended.

Paulo Caetano
Wednesday, March 31, 2004

Don't worry, all the conspiracy theories are true, so you won't be around long enough to worry about activation...

-
Wednesday, March 31, 2004

"Microsoft will also support the activation of Windows XP throughout its life and will _LIKELY_ provide an update that turns activation off at the end of the product's lifecycle"

Anyone that thinks microsoft XP activation keys will be around indefinitely is an idiot. Once microsoft has declared an end-of-lifecycle they will stop supporting activations. I'm sure the "update" will be dropped from their support pages and the only way to find it will be a google search of 3rd party support sites.

I had to call them twice just to get an activation. I don't see it getting any easier.

Microsoft isn't bad for the consumer?
Wednesday, March 31, 2004

Im sorry, but whatever designer drug your on must be something not known in this country, Microsoft is NOT your friend, Microsoft is NOT a charity, Microsoft is a BUSINESS worth billions of dollars and you think they got there by doing you favours?

i normally dont bother with posting but i gotta have a say on this, microsoft is what is known as a monopoly, whats the production cost of a cd? 0.00000001? yet how many copys are microsoft churning out at $$$ a piece?

if you look closely at the design of the cds youll find there is next to no differences at all between them, by tweaking some numbers you can turn an OEM copy into a retail upgrade.

now, if MS was your friend, and activation is merely an anti piracy tool, why is an OEM copy worth $$ and a retail upgrade $$$ when theres at most 8 bytes difference between the two?

my friend, your world is a pure fantasy where i bet the courts are just and the laws fair, try visiting the real one some time.

Matt
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

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