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Joel on Software

Not much traffic going on here...

Either everyone is a .NET genius or there are very few of us that look at this message board.

I'd be interested in finding out what everyone is using .NET for at the moment. 

I'm in the process of writing a basic web CMS (content management system) for my employer (moving from Lotus Domino-based site to .NET)

I'm also working on integrating our legacy Domino apps with our new .NET based systems (Microsoft CRM, etc.)  So far, .NET is a cakewalk compared to Domino to say the least.

In my "spare time", I've started writing a web CMS/Portal Application that takes a different approach (on the back-end) than the others I've seen. 

So lets have it - what are YOU working on?

GiorgioG
Monday, April 14, 2003

.net based website for a heat transfer manufacturer.

Bjorn Toft Madsen
Monday, April 14, 2003

Against my better judgment, using it for a web application. :) Getting close to delivering 1.0, too...

Brad (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Monday, April 14, 2003

Against your better judgement?  Why do you say that? ;-)

GiorgioG
Monday, April 14, 2003

I hate web applications. The web is not the place for applications. HTML is not an application development system.

You spend less time for more features with a rich UI.

Brad (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Monday, April 14, 2003

A variety of tiny projects, from a part of my wife's Web site to an RSS generator to an HTML cleanup utility to a network share enumerator...nothing big, but then I've had my fill of big projects for a while.

Mike Gunderloy
Tuesday, April 15, 2003

I'm learning ASP.NET so I can hopefully get a job with a friend once I graduate in May.

Tim Miller
Tuesday, April 15, 2003

Wow! I have read what the first poster wrote:

> In my "spare time", I've started writing a web
> CMS/Portal Application that takes a different approach
> (on the back-end) than the others I've seen. 

Because it's late at night and I'm very tired, I have read it this way:

In my "spare time", I've started writing a .NET CP/M Portal Application that takes a different approach (on the back-end) than the others I've seen.

Now, say that doesn't sound cool! :) LOL!

George Nicolescu
Tuesday, April 15, 2003

That /does/ sound cool :D

I'm using c# for my final year project at uni - a Database + Web Service + Windows Forms Client to allow a Marketing Department of a Publishing company to centralise all the info they have about books - Authors, Blurb, Cover pages, Production Dates, etc.

I'm now discovering that while there is a fairly hefty amount of work creating a nice database access framework, web service framework, etc. there will be little to indicate it in the front end. And I'm /not allowed/ to submit code with the project, just a demonstration and a report. Which sucks.

Pete Hodgson
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

I'm single-handedly moving all of my orgs old ASP web forms to ASP.NET.  Getting better performance, better UI, better error handling, and better data.  The fact that I'm a better software engineer than the 5 various summer students who they hired to do the previous forms probably has something to do with it though.



"I hate web applications. The web is not the place for applications. HTML is not an application development system.

You spend less time for more features with a rich UI."

While that's true, it's not always yours and my time that matters the most.  IT departments love web applications because all they have to keep updated is the browser (which they have to maintain anyways) and the webserver (which they have to keep patched anyways).

With a web application, deployment struggles are a constant factor ( O(x) where x = some constant), whereas native applications get more and more difficult to deploy ( O(xN) where x > 1) the more users as you have more and more different environments to deal with (this user has Windows XP, this one has 2000, this one has Pro, this one has Home, this one has Pro with Gator installed, etc.)

Richard Ponton
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

You can have the exact same deployment effect using a rich .NET app as you do with a rich web app, because of support for loading assemblies over the web. The executable and support libraries can all be stored on the web server, and downloaded only as needed (an installation is not required).

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Wednesday, April 16, 2003

While very viable in some circumstances, it still requires that the clients be upgraded with the correct versions of the .NET Framework, be running sufficiently current Windows, and use IE.

Still nowhere near as easy for IT admins as a web app, especially if the IT department in question doesn't have authority over all of the users of your app.

Last I heard, .NET native GUI apps don't run on Mac or Linux very well yet.  Someday.

Richard Ponton
Monday, April 21, 2003

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