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the non-commercial version of delphi

Sorry, this is a total newbie question that i SHOULD be able to figure out on borland.com but can't: How is the personal $99 version of delphi for non-commercial programs different from the $999 one, apart from price and what you can make? Does it lack features? And do apps built with it have something that says it was built with the non-commercial version or anything, will users notice? I am lost!

delphi-newbie
Thursday, October 10, 2002

Oh and one other point on this: The trial version of Delphi 7 enterprise which I got from borland's site seems to include a lot of stuff to make grabbing web pages and doing web services easy, if there is indeed a difference between the versions I mentioned, is this in the personal version?

delphi-newbie
Thursday, October 10, 2002

Here are a couple of URL's that might answer your question:

For Delphi 7:
http://www.borland.com/delphi/pdf/del7_feamatrix.pdf

For Delphi 6:
http://www.borland.com/delphi/pdf/del6_feamatrix.pdf

Those pages always answered by C++Builder questions, so I would imagine they have that you're interested in finding out.

Andrew Burton
Thursday, October 10, 2002

Oh thanks, yeah, didn't see that! Turns out the personal version leaves out all the internet and web services stuff, sucks. Guess I'll stick with VB since I already own it (but really like the idea of delphi better).

delphi-newbie
Thursday, October 10, 2002

I got my copy of Delphi 3 Professional from eBay for a song.  I would seriously recommend keeping an eye at eBay for D3, D4, etc.

Andrew Burton
Thursday, October 10, 2002

Yes, you can get a copy of Delphi 3 Professional on ebay for less than $50.  Then you can upgrade to Delphi 7 Professional for, I think, $399.  Saves you a bit of money.  And Delphi 3 or 4 may be all you need, anyway.

Herbert Sitz
Thursday, October 10, 2002

I got my copy of D$ Pro off ebay for $100 Ebay is a good place to look.

NPG
Thursday, October 10, 2002

Darn.

I would have given you my copy of Delphi 3 Pro for the cost of shipping, if I hadn't of tossed the disc a couple of years ago.  Nothing against Delphi, I just didn't really care much for the Pascal syntax or programming on the losing team. 

Which company owns Delphi now?  ;-)

Ah Delphi 3... remember the days when development came with big softcover manuals?  I think VS.NET came with a couple of posters and a 100 page "Getting Started" booklet.  Ah how times have changed... ;-)

Guy Incognito
Thursday, October 10, 2002

One of the big things that the Personal edition leaves out is the database stuff...

Alvin Lee
Friday, October 11, 2002

Personal leaves out pretty much everything except plain Windows programming: no databases, no web stuff (except a couple of basic socket components).

It also leaves out some painfully simple stuff, as I discovered to my chagrin: like a local variables window in the debugger (you have to use watches!!) and all the code-completion functions. "Argh" he stated.

Borland still owns Delphi. Yes, they stupidly tried to rename themselves to Inprise, but seem to have seen the light.

Aaron Lawrence
Friday, October 11, 2002

If you're not doing web or database work, then it mostly comes down to the non-commercial issue.  Petty though it may sound, I'm not convinced that taking a product that's perfectly good for developing desktop applications, and hobbling it simply by writing "for non-commercial use only" in the license file is a legitimate move.

I'm in the situation where I don't need database or web components, but I sure like the GUI-building aspects of Delphi.  At $950, though, there's a strong incentive to look elsewhere.  Heck, for the same price I can buy the full version of Visual Studio .NET which includes Visual C++ *and* Visual Basic.

JH
Friday, October 11, 2002

As a note about which company "owns" Delphi (as mentioned by Guy Incognito): Delphi has always been owned by the same company (Borland), however said company tried its hand at casting a new persona for a while (into a middleware company primary), and became legally known as "Inprise". After a while they figured that it was pretty foolish to ignore the name recognition and respect that the Borland name held (I always referred to them as Borland), so they reverted back.

I love Visual C++, and C++ happens to be my language of choice. Having said that, I absolutely _DESPISE_ Visual Basic: That bastard piece of crud was one of the worst projects to ever come out of Microsoft, and if there's one thing I'm thankful for, it's that it makes it easy to separate the factless, hop-on-the-bandwagon talentless poseurs when someone starts talking about how Visual Basic is their favourite. I'd rather not be on the "winning team" if it has anything to do with Visual Basic.

Dennis Forbes
Friday, October 11, 2002

I just wanted to point out that there are ways to get database functionality out of the person edition of Delphi.  One method is to use Interbase/Firebird with IBObjects:  www.ibobjects.com  .  IBObjects has a "trustware" licensing policy that would let you try it out for free. 

I think there may be a couple other ways to get database functionality with personal edition, but I can't recall them at the moment.

Herbert Sitz
Friday, October 11, 2002

Oh yeah, I also have to agree that adding the non-commercial clause to the license as well as removing all the stuff it's missing (seriously, auto-completion!?) is stupid. Removing the functionality that's gone should be more than enough to persuade real developers with $1000 to spend to buy the professional version, adding the non-commercial clause as well is just too much. They should either say "sure, sell whatever you make, it just is going to be harder to code" that'd be fine, and similarily, I'd shell out more than $99 in a second if I got the professional edition but wasn't allowed to sell the apps, but having BOTH those clauses is a deal-breaker for me. I thought companies in the number 2 (or lower) spot had to offer MORE than the market leaders in order to survive, not less.

Also, removing features like DB access I can see as a legit way to get people to upgrade, but by removing code completion, isn't that just going to make people who try out the personal version think it's a bit more painful to use and not bother ever upgrading? I think that's a counter-productive thing to leave out, because it just makes the product look less polished and simple (and noone is going to make their upgrade decision based on getting code completion).

delphi-newbie
Saturday, October 12, 2002

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