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Relative font size - feature request?

I try to make sites in which the font size is not fixed so that the browser View | Text Size option works for those of feeble sight (like myself).

Hence, it would be nice if the Font Size selector had the option of being relative instead of fixed. Or perhaps two font size selectors - fixed and relative.

The relative scale could go say -3,-2,-1,+1,+2,+3.

Note: For my own browsing I use Opera which overcomes this problem elegantly by scaling everything - but apparently many people still prefer to use inferior browsers :) 

Mike Osborne
Monday, December 22, 2003

Mike Osborne :re Relative font size

I [proudly] happen to use IE 6.x and I must say -- sincerely -- that it’s outstandingly superior to anything else that might pretend to compete. And I say pretend being overly generous cause nothing really can compete with Internet Explorer. :)

Insofar as the RFS feature -- I also happen to believe that CSS does a very creditable job with the many formatting options one would ever need and very specifically dealing with RFS features. In fact CSS should be the styling standard within CityDesk.

Now from an end-user perspective CSS is not the way to do things. MS Word styling is the way to do things -- from and end-user perspective. And it would be just wonderful if FC would provide *much* better MS word integration in CD Norma view – that way all the styling power of Word would be available.

David Mozer
Monday, December 22, 2003

David, do you work for Microsoft?

Jeff Kolker
Tuesday, December 23, 2003

Jeff Kolker :re Do I work for MS?

No, I do not. I am self-employed and will remain self-employed for as long as I can.

I do respect and admire MS -- why? because I know no other technology company [in the history of humanity] that has done so much to ENABLE end-users. And I have been at this technology game for 20+ years.

David Mozer
Tuesday, December 23, 2003

Agreed but when you try Opera or Firebird you realise how stagnant Microsoft's web browser offering has become.

John Topley (www.johntopley.com)
Tuesday, December 23, 2003

"outstandingly superior to anything else that might pretend to compete" - I use IE 6 too - I must be missing something. Which particular features of IE 6 are outstandingly superior to those of Opera 7?

Agree with your other points - application of a "palette" of styles from stylesheets (similar to MS Word styles) would be useful.

A true WYSIWYG "normal" view would be really nice - but would I want to pay for it?

Mike Osborne
Tuesday, December 23, 2003

John Topley :re Opera or Firebird

I have tried O&F .. plus ... and I keep coming back to Internet Explorer. My clients [bar none] are all using IE and until I have a compelling reason to switch I have zero use for the pretenders. I want to make money. Can O&F improve my bottom line --- so far the only *thing* that O&F have accomplished is attract a niche -- the anti-MS crowd. My technology world is MS Windows.

I see absolutely nothing stagnant about the progress MS is making with Windows and the technology that makes Windows attractive to the great majority of end-users.

David Mozer
Tuesday, December 23, 2003

What would improve my bottom line is an operating system that worked all the time.  Conventional wisdom has it that your computer should be reformatted and Windows reinstalled every so often.  I seem to do it once a year.  Not very productive as far as I am concerned. 

Microsoft has some good products, but I'm not sure they are that you seem to give them credit.  Remeber Lotus made the spreadsheet popular (and don't forget Visicalc) and Wordstar for wordprocessing.  Graphical interfaces weren't their invention either

It seems the true enabling of end-users comes from small companies who develop new technologies.  Microsoft is great at taking ideas (that aren't original) and out-marketing everyone until they are dominant.

Something that kinda sums everything up is one time my computer crashed.  Windows 98SE would not load, as one of the primary files became corrupt.  Right during the end of tax season (i'm an accountant as well as a computer guy) and I had NO time at all for that kind of nonsense.  My Dad, who is also my parter came into my office...clicked his mechanical pencil a few times... and said "My pencil never crashes".  While he was just trying to give me a hard time, he is right in that computers (primarily the Operating environment) are not as stable as they should be. 

Been in the PC computer world 20+ years too... started as a computer tech when I was 16 when the IBM PC came out.  And always open to new ideas that work well... ;)

Jeff Kolker
Tuesday, December 23, 2003

Jeff Kolker :re operating system that worked all the time.

My Windows OS [on the desktop and the Sever] works ALL the time – 24/7 – eacvh and every day. And the same holds true for my clients. But then I do know what I am doing.

Perhaps you should learn how to -- its hard work learning how to. But once you learn you'll find that Windows is ROCK SOLID and an order of magnitude much more enabling.

David Mozer
Tuesday, December 23, 2003

David,

I use Opera and Firebird in addition to IE because they enable me to check that my website is usable in a wide variety of browsers. I also like a lot of the features that they offer over and above IE, such as tabbed browsing, better bookmark management etc. To dismiss them as inferior because a lot of people who use them are anti-Microsoft is a poor argument.

I said that Microsoft's browser offering is stagnant not their operating system. I'm really excited about some of the things that are going to be in Windows Longhorn. On the other hand, have you noticed how there have been no new versions of IE since Microsoft won the browser war?

I'm generally a fan of Microsoft and their products but I try to keep an open mind and evaluate things based on merit.

John Topley (www.johntopley.com)
Wednesday, December 24, 2003

John Topley :re not their operating system.

The browser [IE] as we currently know it in the MS world will one day disappear -- the OS will contain a service that will function as a internet browser just like all the other enabling technologies MS has built-into the OS paradigm. The windows file system is changing and will emerge I suspect in Longhorn -- rendering *many* management attributes [that will also include "bookmarks", etc.]

For me the issue IS making money -- and for the past 4 years 100% of my clients are using IE; plus 94% of their clients are using IE. My clients do not waste time appealing to 6% of the market consequently I will not waste my time doing the same. However, IF I could make money on the 6% that would change my mind - and so far I have not been able to build a business case that makes it worth while.

David Mozer
Wednesday, December 24, 2003

Jeff Kolker :re true enabling of end-users comes from small companies

Sorry Jeff -- but you could not be more wrong or slightly right.

Its true that many small companies have made positive contributions and MS has very smartly exploited all -- that is the nature of business and human beings.

However, the KEY to success [from every angle] is knowing how-to market -- exactly where MS has excelled -- and THAT is brilliant. FYI, MS owns many patents, perhaps even challenging IBM in the number of patents held in certain areas.

Regardless how wonderful some technology can be --Enabling Technology has little to no value unless it gains acceptance by the masses. MS understands this better than anyone and MS has done a fantastic job enabling the masses to do things that are next to impossible to fathom.

Did you know that the enabling technology called Microsoft Windows can [1] run an *arbitrary* set of applications, in an *arbitrary* configuration, with *arbitrary* devices, and that [2] the Windows Operating System is designed to run on machines that are not designed yet? That is remarkable! And did you know [3] that *ease of use*, *availability of services*, and *plug and play* are pretty much the antithesis of security [and functionality] in a poorly configured computer system and network? Insofar as *[3]* is concerned MS is addressing this – much of that may be unveiled via Longhorn.

Well this is as much as I can state :-)

David Mozer
Sunday, December 28, 2003

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